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Article: Species diversity of three major urban forest types in Guangzhou City, China

TitleSpecies diversity of three major urban forest types in Guangzhou City, China
Authors
KeywordsGuangzhou
Institutional forest
Park forest
Roadside forest
Species diversity
Urban forest
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foreco
Citation
Forest Ecology And Management, 2001, v. 146 n. 1-3, p. 99-114 How to Cite?
AbstractGuangzhou city in South China was assessed to understand the associations between tree species diversity and urban development. The study area covers five urban districts which form the bulk of the built-up areas. Reconnaissance field trips and aerial photograph survey identified main green covers in three urban-forest types, namely roadside niches, urban parks, and institutional grounds. Trees at roadsides and 21 parks were censused, whereas 14 large institutional sites were sampled. A total of 115,140 trees were evaluated for species identification, dimensions and site-environs conditions, with 40.8% at roadsides, 38.2% in parks, and 21.0% in institutional grounds. The urban forests composed of 254 species in 62 botanical families led by Moraceae, Caesalpiniaceae and Myrtaceae. Institutional forest has the highest diversity, followed by park and roadside trees. Most trees are derived from a small group of dominant species. Broadleaf species are prominent, especially the evergreen, whereas conifers and palms are sparingly adopted, except palms in institutional areas. Exotic species, mainly originating from tropical Asia and Australia, are common but not as dominating as in other tropical cities. Native species include spontaneous invasion into ruderal habitats, especially in parks. Species composition was interpreted vis-à-vis the interplay of natural and cultural factors then and now. Changing site conditions (geometric vs. physiological attributes), decision-making and management regimes (official-public vs. individual-lot stewardship), funding constraint (straitjacketed vs. adequate), intended amenity functions, and evolving landscape fashion (traditional vs. innovative), have helped to mould respective species assemblages to define their identity. Implications for long-term tree planning and management in Guangzhou and other fast developing cities are explored. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86109
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.826
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.749
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:12:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:12:59Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationForest Ecology And Management, 2001, v. 146 n. 1-3, p. 99-114en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-1127en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86109-
dc.description.abstractGuangzhou city in South China was assessed to understand the associations between tree species diversity and urban development. The study area covers five urban districts which form the bulk of the built-up areas. Reconnaissance field trips and aerial photograph survey identified main green covers in three urban-forest types, namely roadside niches, urban parks, and institutional grounds. Trees at roadsides and 21 parks were censused, whereas 14 large institutional sites were sampled. A total of 115,140 trees were evaluated for species identification, dimensions and site-environs conditions, with 40.8% at roadsides, 38.2% in parks, and 21.0% in institutional grounds. The urban forests composed of 254 species in 62 botanical families led by Moraceae, Caesalpiniaceae and Myrtaceae. Institutional forest has the highest diversity, followed by park and roadside trees. Most trees are derived from a small group of dominant species. Broadleaf species are prominent, especially the evergreen, whereas conifers and palms are sparingly adopted, except palms in institutional areas. Exotic species, mainly originating from tropical Asia and Australia, are common but not as dominating as in other tropical cities. Native species include spontaneous invasion into ruderal habitats, especially in parks. Species composition was interpreted vis-à-vis the interplay of natural and cultural factors then and now. Changing site conditions (geometric vs. physiological attributes), decision-making and management regimes (official-public vs. individual-lot stewardship), funding constraint (straitjacketed vs. adequate), intended amenity functions, and evolving landscape fashion (traditional vs. innovative), have helped to mould respective species assemblages to define their identity. Implications for long-term tree planning and management in Guangzhou and other fast developing cities are explored. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forecoen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofForest Ecology and Managementen_HK
dc.rightsForest Ecology and Management. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectGuangzhouen_HK
dc.subjectInstitutional foresten_HK
dc.subjectPark foresten_HK
dc.subjectRoadside foresten_HK
dc.subjectSpecies diversityen_HK
dc.subjectUrban foresten_HK
dc.titleSpecies diversity of three major urban forest types in Guangzhou City, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0378-1127&volume=146&spage=99&epage=114&date=2001&atitle=Species+diversity+of+three+major+urban+forest+types+in+Guangzhou+City,+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0378-1127(00)00449-7en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035371264en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros57500en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035371264&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume146en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage99en_HK
dc.identifier.epage114en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000168636800009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, HT=7409747863en_HK

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