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Article: Combining information seeking services into a meta supply chain of facts

TitleCombining information seeking services into a meta supply chain of facts
Authors
KeywordsBusiness intelligence
Fact seeking
Meta search
Question answering
Issue Date2008
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems. The Journal's web site is located at http://jais.aisnet.org/
Citation
Journal Of The Association Of Information Systems, 2008, v. 9 n. 3-4, p. article no. 8, 175-199 How to Cite?
AbstractThe World Wide Web has become a vital supplier of information that allows organizations to carry on such tasks as business intelligence, security monitoring, and risk assessments. Having a quick and reliable supply of correct facts from perspective is often mission critical. By following design science guidelines, we have explored ways to recombine facts from multiple sources, each with possibly different levels of responsiveness and accuracy into one robust supply chain. Inspired by prior research on keyword-based meta-search engines (e.g., metacrawler.com), we have adapted the existing question answering algorithms for the task of analysis and triangulation of facts. We present a first prototype for a meta approach to fact seeking. Our meta engine sends a user's question to several fact seeking services that are publicly available on the Web (e.g., ask.com, brainboost.com, answerbus.com, NSIR, etc.) and analyzes the returned results jointly to identify and present to the user those that are most likely to be factually correct. The results of our evaluation on the standard test sets widely used in prior research support the evidence for the following: 1) the value-added of the meta approach: its performance surpasses the performance of each supplier, 2) the importance of using fact seeking services as suppliers to the meta engine rather than keyword driven search portals, and 3) the resilience of the meta approach: eliminating a single service does not noticeably impact the overall performance. We show that these properties make the meta-approach a more reliable supplier of facts than any of the currently available stand-alone services. Copyright © 2008, by the Association for Information Systems.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85890
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.79
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.786
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRoussinov, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:10:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:10:25Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Association Of Information Systems, 2008, v. 9 n. 3-4, p. article no. 8, 175-199en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1536-9323en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85890-
dc.description.abstractThe World Wide Web has become a vital supplier of information that allows organizations to carry on such tasks as business intelligence, security monitoring, and risk assessments. Having a quick and reliable supply of correct facts from perspective is often mission critical. By following design science guidelines, we have explored ways to recombine facts from multiple sources, each with possibly different levels of responsiveness and accuracy into one robust supply chain. Inspired by prior research on keyword-based meta-search engines (e.g., metacrawler.com), we have adapted the existing question answering algorithms for the task of analysis and triangulation of facts. We present a first prototype for a meta approach to fact seeking. Our meta engine sends a user's question to several fact seeking services that are publicly available on the Web (e.g., ask.com, brainboost.com, answerbus.com, NSIR, etc.) and analyzes the returned results jointly to identify and present to the user those that are most likely to be factually correct. The results of our evaluation on the standard test sets widely used in prior research support the evidence for the following: 1) the value-added of the meta approach: its performance surpasses the performance of each supplier, 2) the importance of using fact seeking services as suppliers to the meta engine rather than keyword driven search portals, and 3) the resilience of the meta approach: eliminating a single service does not noticeably impact the overall performance. We show that these properties make the meta-approach a more reliable supplier of facts than any of the currently available stand-alone services. Copyright © 2008, by the Association for Information Systems.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAssociation for Information Systems. The Journal's web site is located at http://jais.aisnet.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Association of Information Systemsen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBusiness intelligenceen_HK
dc.subjectFact seekingen_HK
dc.subjectMeta searchen_HK
dc.subjectQuestion answeringen_HK
dc.titleCombining information seeking services into a meta supply chain of factsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChau, M: mchau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChau, M=rp01051en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58349106539en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148565en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58349106539&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume9en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_HK
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 8, 175en_HK
dc.identifier.epage199en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoussinov, D=6602305260en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, M=7006073763en_HK

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