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Article: In vitro evaluation of bioactive and biodegradable composites based on polyhydroxybutyrate

TitleIn vitro evaluation of bioactive and biodegradable composites based on polyhydroxybutyrate
Authors
KeywordsBioactivity
Composites
Hydroxyapatite
In vitro testing
Mechanical performance
Polyhydroxybutyrate
Tricalcium phosphate
Issue Date2004
PublisherLavoisier.
Citation
Annales De Chimie: Science Des Materiaux, 2004, v. 29 n. 1, p. 17-28 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo particulate bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP), have been incorporated into polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) to form new composites for tissue replacement and regeneration applications. HA/PHB and TCP/PHB composites containing 10, 20 and 30 vol% of the bioceramics were produced through an established manufacturing process. In vitro studies were conducted using an acellular simulated body fluid (SBF). Composite specimens were immersed in SBF at 37°C for various periods of time prior to surface analyses. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination showed that the earliest nucleation of mineral crystals occurred on HA/PHB composites only after 1 day immersion in SBF. The mineral crystals were composed of microflakes and completely covered the composite surfaces within a few days. The formation of mineral crystals was slower on TCP/PHB composites than on HA/PHB composites. Thin film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD) analysis showed that the mineral crystals had the apatite structure with poor crystallinity and an apatite layer formed and grew on composites with an increase in immersion time. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed that the apatite formed in vitro contained carbonate groups. The formation of a carbonated apatite layer on composite surfaces indicated the in vitro bioactivity of HA/PHB and TCP/PHB composites. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that storage moduli of HA/PHB and TCP/PHB composites increased with immersion time within the duration of in vitro experiments, which was attributed to the formation of the apatite layer on composites.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85445
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 0.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.102
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorNi, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:04:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:04:52Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnales De Chimie: Science Des Materiaux, 2004, v. 29 n. 1, p. 17-28en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0151-9107en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85445-
dc.description.abstractTwo particulate bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP), have been incorporated into polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) to form new composites for tissue replacement and regeneration applications. HA/PHB and TCP/PHB composites containing 10, 20 and 30 vol% of the bioceramics were produced through an established manufacturing process. In vitro studies were conducted using an acellular simulated body fluid (SBF). Composite specimens were immersed in SBF at 37°C for various periods of time prior to surface analyses. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination showed that the earliest nucleation of mineral crystals occurred on HA/PHB composites only after 1 day immersion in SBF. The mineral crystals were composed of microflakes and completely covered the composite surfaces within a few days. The formation of mineral crystals was slower on TCP/PHB composites than on HA/PHB composites. Thin film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD) analysis showed that the mineral crystals had the apatite structure with poor crystallinity and an apatite layer formed and grew on composites with an increase in immersion time. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed that the apatite formed in vitro contained carbonate groups. The formation of a carbonated apatite layer on composite surfaces indicated the in vitro bioactivity of HA/PHB and TCP/PHB composites. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that storage moduli of HA/PHB and TCP/PHB composites increased with immersion time within the duration of in vitro experiments, which was attributed to the formation of the apatite layer on composites.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLavoisier.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnales de Chimie: Science des Materiauxen_HK
dc.subjectBioactivityen_HK
dc.subjectCompositesen_HK
dc.subjectHydroxyapatiteen_HK
dc.subjectIn vitro testingen_HK
dc.subjectMechanical performanceen_HK
dc.subjectPolyhydroxybutyrateen_HK
dc.subjectTricalcium phosphateen_HK
dc.titleIn vitro evaluation of bioactive and biodegradable composites based on polyhydroxybutyrateen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, M:memwang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00185en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3042835172en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros89117en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3042835172&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage17en_HK
dc.identifier.epage28en_HK
dc.publisher.placeFranceen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=15749714100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNi, J=8859102900en_HK

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