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Article: Friction and wear of hydroxyapatite reinforced high density polyethylene against the stainless steel counterface

TitleFriction and wear of hydroxyapatite reinforced high density polyethylene against the stainless steel counterface
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0957-4530
Citation
Journal Of Materials Science: Materials In Medicine, 2002, v. 13 n. 6, p. 607-611 How to Cite?
AbstractHydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) was invented as a biomaterial for skeletal applications. In this investigation, tribological properties (e.g. wear rate and coefficient of friction) of unfilled HDPE and HA/HDPE composites were evaluated against the duplex stainless steel in dry and lubricated conditions, with distilled water or aqueous solutions of proteins (egg albumen or glucose) being lubricants. Wear tests were conducted in a custom-built test rig for HDPE and HA/HDPE containing up to 40 vol % of HA. It was found that HA/HDPE composites had lower coefficients of friction than unfilled HDPE under certain conditions. HA/HDPE also exhibited less severe fatigue failure marks than HDPE. The degradation and fatigue failure of HDPE due to the presence of proteins were severe for low speed wear testing (100 rpm) as compared to high speed wear testing (200 rpm). This was due possibly to the high shear rate at the contact which could remove any degraded film instantaneously at high sliding speed, while with a low sliding speed the build-up of a degraded layer of protein could occur. The degraded protein layer would stay at the contact for a longer time and mechanical activation would induce adverse reactions, weakening the surface layer of HDPE. Both egg albumen and glucose were found to be corrosive to steel and adversely reactive for HDPE and HA/HDPE composites. The wear modes observed were similar to that of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Specimens tested with egg albumen also displayed higher wear rates, which was again attributed to corrosion accelerated wear. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85425
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.272
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.897
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorChandrasekaran, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorBonfield, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:04:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:04:37Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Materials Science: Materials In Medicine, 2002, v. 13 n. 6, p. 607-611en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0957-4530en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85425-
dc.description.abstractHydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) was invented as a biomaterial for skeletal applications. In this investigation, tribological properties (e.g. wear rate and coefficient of friction) of unfilled HDPE and HA/HDPE composites were evaluated against the duplex stainless steel in dry and lubricated conditions, with distilled water or aqueous solutions of proteins (egg albumen or glucose) being lubricants. Wear tests were conducted in a custom-built test rig for HDPE and HA/HDPE containing up to 40 vol % of HA. It was found that HA/HDPE composites had lower coefficients of friction than unfilled HDPE under certain conditions. HA/HDPE also exhibited less severe fatigue failure marks than HDPE. The degradation and fatigue failure of HDPE due to the presence of proteins were severe for low speed wear testing (100 rpm) as compared to high speed wear testing (200 rpm). This was due possibly to the high shear rate at the contact which could remove any degraded film instantaneously at high sliding speed, while with a low sliding speed the build-up of a degraded layer of protein could occur. The degraded protein layer would stay at the contact for a longer time and mechanical activation would induce adverse reactions, weakening the surface layer of HDPE. Both egg albumen and glucose were found to be corrosive to steel and adversely reactive for HDPE and HA/HDPE composites. The wear modes observed were similar to that of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Specimens tested with egg albumen also displayed higher wear rates, which was again attributed to corrosion accelerated wear. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0957-4530en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicineen_HK
dc.titleFriction and wear of hydroxyapatite reinforced high density polyethylene against the stainless steel counterfaceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0957-4530&volume=13&spage=607&epage=611&date=2002&atitle=Friction+and+wear+of+hydroxyapatite+reinforced+high+density+polyethylene+against+the+stainless+steel+counterfaceen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, M:memwang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00185en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1015139213211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036094801en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros110802en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036094801&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage607en_HK
dc.identifier.epage611en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000175068600011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=15749714100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChandrasekaran, M=23099477900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBonfield, W=16490765800en_HK

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