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Article: Questions without movement: A study of Cantonese-speaking children with and without specific language impairment

TitleQuestions without movement: A study of Cantonese-speaking children with and without specific language impairment
Authors
KeywordsCantonese
Chinese
Developmental language disorders
Specific language impairment
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/
Citation
Journal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2004, v. 47 n. 6, p. 1440-1453 How to Cite?
AbstractEnglish-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) appear to have special difficulty in the use of who-object questions (e.g., Who is the girl chasing?). It has been argued that problems related to grammatical movement may be responsible for this difficulty. However, it is also possible that the lower frequency of who-object questions relative to who-subject questions also plays a role. In this study, the use of who-object and who-subject questions by children with SLI who were acquiring Cantonese as their 1st language was examined. In Cantonese, the surface form of who-object questions (e.g., hung4zai2 sek3 bin1go3? [Bear kiss who?]) reflects the same subject, verb, object order typically used for declarative sentences, and a movement account provides no basis for expecting special difficulties with such questions. As in English, however, Cantonese who-object questions occur less frequently than do who-subject questions. A comparison of preschoolers with SLI, typically developing same-age peers, and younger, typically developing peers revealed that the children with SLI were less accurate in using who-object questions than either of the other participant groups yet showed no differences from these groups in the use of who-subject questions (e.g., bin1go3sek3zyu1zyu1? [Who kiss Piglet?]). The implications of these findings for current accounts of SLI are discussed, and the idea that input frequency and animacy may play a larger role than is often assumed is suggested.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85260
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, AMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeonard, LBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStokes, SFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:02:41Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:02:41Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2004, v. 47 n. 6, p. 1440-1453en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85260-
dc.description.abstractEnglish-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) appear to have special difficulty in the use of who-object questions (e.g., Who is the girl chasing?). It has been argued that problems related to grammatical movement may be responsible for this difficulty. However, it is also possible that the lower frequency of who-object questions relative to who-subject questions also plays a role. In this study, the use of who-object and who-subject questions by children with SLI who were acquiring Cantonese as their 1st language was examined. In Cantonese, the surface form of who-object questions (e.g., hung4zai2 sek3 bin1go3? [Bear kiss who?]) reflects the same subject, verb, object order typically used for declarative sentences, and a movement account provides no basis for expecting special difficulties with such questions. As in English, however, Cantonese who-object questions occur less frequently than do who-subject questions. A comparison of preschoolers with SLI, typically developing same-age peers, and younger, typically developing peers revealed that the children with SLI were less accurate in using who-object questions than either of the other participant groups yet showed no differences from these groups in the use of who-subject questions (e.g., bin1go3sek3zyu1zyu1? [Who kiss Piglet?]). The implications of these findings for current accounts of SLI are discussed, and the idea that input frequency and animacy may play a larger role than is often assumed is suggested.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Researchen_HK
dc.subjectCantoneseen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectDevelopmental language disordersen_HK
dc.subjectSpecific language impairmenten_HK
dc.titleQuestions without movement: A study of Cantonese-speaking children with and without specific language impairmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1092-4388&volume=47&issue=6&spage=1440&epage=1453&date=2004&atitle=Questions+Without+Movement:+A+Study+of+Cantonese-speaking+Children+With+and+Without+Specific+Language+Impairmenten_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, AMY: amywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, AMY=rp00973en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2004/107)en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15842021-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-12144277392en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103308en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-12144277392&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume47en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1440en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1453en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232285900017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, AMY=7403147564en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeonard, LB=7101816009en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFletcher, P=36106653500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStokes, SF=7101743675en_HK

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