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Article: Teaching creative writing skills to primary school children in Hong Kong: Discordance between the views and practices of language teachers

TitleTeaching creative writing skills to primary school children in Hong Kong: Discordance between the views and practices of language teachers
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherCreative Education Foundation, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.creativeeducationfoundation.org/jcb.shtml
Citation
Journal Of Creative Behavior, 2003, v. 37 n. 2, p. 77-98 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough creativity has been valued in ancient and contemporary Chinese literature, the degree to which creativity is valued and incorporated into teaching by Chinese language teachers is not known. This information is important given that creativity has been increasingly recognized in the education literature as a component of effective writing. The purpose of this study was to compare the views of Chinese language teachers in Hong Kong about creativity and the acquisition of creative writing skills by primary school children, and their teaching practices. A total of 449 Chinese language teachers, employed at primary schools throughout Hong Kong completed a survey questionnaire. The 14-item questionnaire focused on teachers' views of creativity, their perceptions of how to develop students' creativity, their awareness of creative writing strategies, and teaching practices related to creative writing. With respect to the definition of creativity, teachers identified imagination foremost, followed by inspiration, and original ideas. Teachers identified developing students' confidence, and providing an open atmosphere as essential means of fostering creativity. Despite the apparent value of creativity expressed by the teachers and their familiarity with methods for enhancing creativity, the majority reported using traditional methods of teaching writing. Strategies are recommended for reconciling this discrepancy, and promoting creative writing skills by primary school teachers in Hong Kong and other Chinese speaking societies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85151
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.706
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.850
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, HWHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:01:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:01:25Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Creative Behavior, 2003, v. 37 n. 2, p. 77-98en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-0175en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85151-
dc.description.abstractAlthough creativity has been valued in ancient and contemporary Chinese literature, the degree to which creativity is valued and incorporated into teaching by Chinese language teachers is not known. This information is important given that creativity has been increasingly recognized in the education literature as a component of effective writing. The purpose of this study was to compare the views of Chinese language teachers in Hong Kong about creativity and the acquisition of creative writing skills by primary school children, and their teaching practices. A total of 449 Chinese language teachers, employed at primary schools throughout Hong Kong completed a survey questionnaire. The 14-item questionnaire focused on teachers' views of creativity, their perceptions of how to develop students' creativity, their awareness of creative writing strategies, and teaching practices related to creative writing. With respect to the definition of creativity, teachers identified imagination foremost, followed by inspiration, and original ideas. Teachers identified developing students' confidence, and providing an open atmosphere as essential means of fostering creativity. Despite the apparent value of creativity expressed by the teachers and their familiarity with methods for enhancing creativity, the majority reported using traditional methods of teaching writing. Strategies are recommended for reconciling this discrepancy, and promoting creative writing skills by primary school teachers in Hong Kong and other Chinese speaking societies.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCreative Education Foundation, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.creativeeducationfoundation.org/jcb.shtmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Creative Behavioren_HK
dc.titleTeaching creative writing skills to primary school children in Hong Kong: Discordance between the views and practices of language teachersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, WM: cwming@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, SK: sktse@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, WM=rp00896en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, SK=rp00964en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-7444265789en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros150142en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros77684-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-7444265789&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage77en_HK
dc.identifier.epage98en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, WM=22984269400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, SK=7006643153en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, HWH=7006768493en_HK

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