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Article: Whether highly curious students thrive academically depends on perceptions about the school learning environment: A study of Hong Kong adolescents

TitleWhether highly curious students thrive academically depends on perceptions about the school learning environment: A study of Hong Kong adolescents
Authors
KeywordsCulture
Curiosity
Education
Performance
Self-esteem
Well-being
Issue Date2007
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0146-7239
Citation
Motivation And Emotion, 2007, v. 31 n. 4, p. 260-270 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study tested whether the perceived academic values of a school moderate whether highly curious students thrive academically. We investigated the interactive effects of curiosity and school quality on academic success for 484 Hong Kong high school students. Chinese versions of the Curiosity and Exploration Inventory, Subjective Happiness Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem scales were administered and shown to have acceptable measurement properties. We obtained Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (HKCEE) scores (national achievement tests) from participating schools. Results yielded Trait Curiosity × Perceived School Quality interactions in predicting HKCEE scores and school grades. Adolescents with greater trait curiosity in more challenging schools had the greatest academic success; adolescents with greater trait curiosity in less challenging schools had the least academic success. Findings were not attributable to subjective happiness or self-esteem and alternative models involving these positive attributes were not supported. Results suggest that the benefits of curiosity are activated by student beliefs that the school environment supports their values about growth and learning; these benefits can be disabled by perceived person-environment mismatches. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85100
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.612
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.186
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKashdan, TBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:00:50Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:00:50Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMotivation And Emotion, 2007, v. 31 n. 4, p. 260-270en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0146-7239en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85100-
dc.description.abstractThe present study tested whether the perceived academic values of a school moderate whether highly curious students thrive academically. We investigated the interactive effects of curiosity and school quality on academic success for 484 Hong Kong high school students. Chinese versions of the Curiosity and Exploration Inventory, Subjective Happiness Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem scales were administered and shown to have acceptable measurement properties. We obtained Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (HKCEE) scores (national achievement tests) from participating schools. Results yielded Trait Curiosity × Perceived School Quality interactions in predicting HKCEE scores and school grades. Adolescents with greater trait curiosity in more challenging schools had the greatest academic success; adolescents with greater trait curiosity in less challenging schools had the least academic success. Findings were not attributable to subjective happiness or self-esteem and alternative models involving these positive attributes were not supported. Results suggest that the benefits of curiosity are activated by student beliefs that the school environment supports their values about growth and learning; these benefits can be disabled by perceived person-environment mismatches. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0146-7239en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMotivation and Emotionen_HK
dc.subjectCultureen_HK
dc.subjectCuriosityen_HK
dc.subjectEducationen_HK
dc.subjectPerformanceen_HK
dc.subjectSelf-esteemen_HK
dc.subjectWell-beingen_HK
dc.titleWhether highly curious students thrive academically depends on perceptions about the school learning environment: A study of Hong Kong adolescentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0146-7239&volume=31&spage=260&epage=270&date=2007&atitle=Whether+highly+curious+students+thrive+academically+depends+on+perceptions+about+the+school+learning+environment+:+A+study+of+Hong+Kong+adolescents++en_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, M: mtyuen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, M=rp00984en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11031-007-9074-9en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-36749020125en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros144474en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-36749020125&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage260en_HK
dc.identifier.epage270en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251579800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKashdan, TB=6602002113en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, M=7102031935en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5498151-

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