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Article: Do modes of thinking predict career interest types among Chinese university students?

TitleDo modes of thinking predict career interest types among Chinese university students?
Authors
KeywordsCareer interest types
Modes of thinking
Issue Date2007
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/706922/description#description
Citation
Thinking Skills And Creativity, 2007, v. 2 n. 2, p. 118-127 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study had two objectives. The preliminary objective was to further test the psychometric properties of the short-version self-directed search that was intended to be a brief research tool for measuring Holland [Holland, J. L. (1973). Making vocational choices: A theory of careers. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; Holland, J. L. (1994). Self-directed search. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources] six career interest types. The primary objective, though, was to examine the predictive power of modes of thinking for career interest types. Modes of thinking were grounded in Torrance's [Torrance, E. P. (1981). Implications of whole-brained theories of learning and thinking for computer-based instruction. Journal of Computer-Based Instruction, 7(4), 99-105] notion of brain dominance. Two hundred and seventy-two university students from Shanghai, People's Republic of China, responded to the style of learning and thinking and the short-version self-directed search. Results showed that after gender effect was taken into account, the holistic mode of thinking (characterized by its creativity-generating tendency) significantly predicted five of the six career interest types (realistic, investigative, artistic, social, and enterprising) defined by Holland. The analytic mode of thinking (characterized by its tendency for norm-conformity) contributed to Holland's conventional career interest type. We discuss implications of these findings for university educational and career counselors and for faculty members. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85087
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.022
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.723
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lfen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:00:41Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:00:41Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThinking Skills And Creativity, 2007, v. 2 n. 2, p. 118-127en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1871-1871en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85087-
dc.description.abstractThis study had two objectives. The preliminary objective was to further test the psychometric properties of the short-version self-directed search that was intended to be a brief research tool for measuring Holland [Holland, J. L. (1973). Making vocational choices: A theory of careers. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; Holland, J. L. (1994). Self-directed search. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources] six career interest types. The primary objective, though, was to examine the predictive power of modes of thinking for career interest types. Modes of thinking were grounded in Torrance's [Torrance, E. P. (1981). Implications of whole-brained theories of learning and thinking for computer-based instruction. Journal of Computer-Based Instruction, 7(4), 99-105] notion of brain dominance. Two hundred and seventy-two university students from Shanghai, People's Republic of China, responded to the style of learning and thinking and the short-version self-directed search. Results showed that after gender effect was taken into account, the holistic mode of thinking (characterized by its creativity-generating tendency) significantly predicted five of the six career interest types (realistic, investigative, artistic, social, and enterprising) defined by Holland. The analytic mode of thinking (characterized by its tendency for norm-conformity) contributed to Holland's conventional career interest type. We discuss implications of these findings for university educational and career counselors and for faculty members. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/706922/description#descriptionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofThinking Skills and Creativityen_HK
dc.subjectCareer interest typesen_HK
dc.subjectModes of thinkingen_HK
dc.titleDo modes of thinking predict career interest types among Chinese university students?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1871-1871&volume=2&issue=2&spage=118&epage=127&date=2007&atitle=Do+modes+of+thinking+predict+career+interest+types+among+Chinese+university+students?++en_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, Lf: lfzhang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, Lf=rp00988en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tsc.2007.09.001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35648929459en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros143176en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35648929459&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage118en_HK
dc.identifier.epage127en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208447200005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Lf=15039838600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, W=16052146300en_HK

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