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Article: "You may think that; I couldn't possibly comment!" Modality studies: Contemporary research and future directions. Part I

Title"You may think that; I couldn't possibly comment!" Modality studies: Contemporary research and future directions. Part I
Authors
KeywordsDeontic
Epistemic
Event modality
Evidentiality
Irrealis
Modal expressions
Modality
Propositional modality
Realis
Typology
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pragma
Citation
Journal Of Pragmatics, 2005, v. 37 n. 8 SPEC. ISS., p. 1295-1321 How to Cite?
AbstractThis two-part article critically reviews eight recent works in the field of mood and modality. Part I explores three different theoretical approaches - generative, cognitive-pragmatic, and typological - with the main focus on languages other than English. Within the framework of generative grammar, research issues include: the epistemic-root interpretations of modal verbs; transitive-intransitive (dyadic-monadic) alternations; modal verb complementation, and the interaction of the modals with other systems, including negation, and alternate ways of encoding modality. The cognitive-pragmatic approach hones in on epistemic modality, and focuses on the cognitive mechanisms that become activated once speakers express evaluations of given states of affairs, involving various modal expression types. Reflecting mounting interest in grammatical typology as a whole, typological approaches to modality recognize this domain as a valid cross-language grammatical category, similar to tense and aspect, and establish a range of typological categories, which include propositional modality (epistemic and evidential) and event modality (deontic and dynamic). Part I also includes a descriptive account of the modal verb system in Danish. In Part II, the emphasis is on work in relation to (primarily) English, much of which is corpus-driven, and on non-verbal as well as verbal carriers of modal meanings. Thus, description and analysis move purposefully towards a more comprehensive account of the field, to embrace modal expressions such as modal lexical verbs, modal adverbs, and modal adjectives. The pragmatics of modality; the discursive functions of modal expressions, especially modal adverbs; and the treatment of modality in modern descriptive grammars of English are also covered. The article reflects mounting interest in recent years in modality studies. Whilst broadening the scope of modality studies to include treatment of non-verbal modal expressions is to be welcomed, comparatively little attention has so far been given to how different types of modal expression may combine in text to create modal synergy. Following a case study investigation into pragmatics and modality in Part II, the paper outlines an agenda for further research within a discourse and pragmatic perspective. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85070
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.153
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHoye, LFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:00:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:00:30Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pragmatics, 2005, v. 37 n. 8 SPEC. ISS., p. 1295-1321en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-2166en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85070-
dc.description.abstractThis two-part article critically reviews eight recent works in the field of mood and modality. Part I explores three different theoretical approaches - generative, cognitive-pragmatic, and typological - with the main focus on languages other than English. Within the framework of generative grammar, research issues include: the epistemic-root interpretations of modal verbs; transitive-intransitive (dyadic-monadic) alternations; modal verb complementation, and the interaction of the modals with other systems, including negation, and alternate ways of encoding modality. The cognitive-pragmatic approach hones in on epistemic modality, and focuses on the cognitive mechanisms that become activated once speakers express evaluations of given states of affairs, involving various modal expression types. Reflecting mounting interest in grammatical typology as a whole, typological approaches to modality recognize this domain as a valid cross-language grammatical category, similar to tense and aspect, and establish a range of typological categories, which include propositional modality (epistemic and evidential) and event modality (deontic and dynamic). Part I also includes a descriptive account of the modal verb system in Danish. In Part II, the emphasis is on work in relation to (primarily) English, much of which is corpus-driven, and on non-verbal as well as verbal carriers of modal meanings. Thus, description and analysis move purposefully towards a more comprehensive account of the field, to embrace modal expressions such as modal lexical verbs, modal adverbs, and modal adjectives. The pragmatics of modality; the discursive functions of modal expressions, especially modal adverbs; and the treatment of modality in modern descriptive grammars of English are also covered. The article reflects mounting interest in recent years in modality studies. Whilst broadening the scope of modality studies to include treatment of non-verbal modal expressions is to be welcomed, comparatively little attention has so far been given to how different types of modal expression may combine in text to create modal synergy. Following a case study investigation into pragmatics and modality in Part II, the paper outlines an agenda for further research within a discourse and pragmatic perspective. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pragmaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pragmaticsen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Pragmatics. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectDeonticen_HK
dc.subjectEpistemicen_HK
dc.subjectEvent modalityen_HK
dc.subjectEvidentialityen_HK
dc.subjectIrrealisen_HK
dc.subjectModal expressionsen_HK
dc.subjectModalityen_HK
dc.subjectPropositional modalityen_HK
dc.subjectRealisen_HK
dc.subjectTypologyen_HK
dc.title"You may think that; I couldn't possibly comment!" Modality studies: Contemporary research and future directions. Part Ien_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0378-2166&volume=37 &issue=8&spage=1295&epage=1321&date=2005&atitle=You+may+think+that;+I+couldn%27t+possibly+comment!+Modality+studies:+Contemporary+research+and+future+directions+-+Part+I+en_HK
dc.identifier.emailHoye, LF: leohoye@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHoye, LF=rp00905en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pragma.2005.01.004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-18744414515en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros123494en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-18744414515&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8 SPEC. ISS.en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1295en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1321en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229708300009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHoye, LF=8579111900en_HK

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