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Article: The development of discourse referencing in Cantonese-speaking children

TitleThe development of discourse referencing in Cantonese-speaking children
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JCL
Citation
Journal Of Child Language, 2004, v. 31 n. 3, p. 633-660 How to Cite?
AbstractThe ability to make clear reference in connected discourse was examined in children learning Cantonese, a Chinese language where noun phrase constituents, whatever their grammatical role, are omissible from sentences under discourse conditions that are not well-understood. Forty-three typically developing children aged 3;0, 5;0, 7;0 and 12;0 told 16 stories based on picture sequences. A panel of adult native Cantonese speakers was asked to judge the referential adequacy of each child's stories by identifying the character the child was talking about in 32 targeted referential acts. The targeted acts were of three sorts: MAINTENANCE of a known character, INTRODUCTION of a second new character, and REINTRODUCTION of a known character. Reference was judged to be adequate when 3 out of 4 'listeners' could successfully identify the character. Children's referential expressions were most adequate for Maintenance, less adequate for Introduction, and least adequate for Reintroduction. The twelve- and seven-year-olds approached ceiling on all three functions. The five-year-olds scored poorly on Reintroduction, and the three-year-olds failed both Introduction and Reintroduction, despite knowledge of at least one of the possible linguistic forms required for these acts as evidenced in a sentence imitation task. Viewed within the framework of Levelt's (1989) discourse model, the data improve our understanding of the developmental period during which children learn to make appropriate presuppositions about the listener's knowledge and attentional states.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85067
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.174
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.787
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, AMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:00:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:00:28Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Child Language, 2004, v. 31 n. 3, p. 633-660en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0305-0009en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85067-
dc.description.abstractThe ability to make clear reference in connected discourse was examined in children learning Cantonese, a Chinese language where noun phrase constituents, whatever their grammatical role, are omissible from sentences under discourse conditions that are not well-understood. Forty-three typically developing children aged 3;0, 5;0, 7;0 and 12;0 told 16 stories based on picture sequences. A panel of adult native Cantonese speakers was asked to judge the referential adequacy of each child's stories by identifying the character the child was talking about in 32 targeted referential acts. The targeted acts were of three sorts: MAINTENANCE of a known character, INTRODUCTION of a second new character, and REINTRODUCTION of a known character. Reference was judged to be adequate when 3 out of 4 'listeners' could successfully identify the character. Children's referential expressions were most adequate for Maintenance, less adequate for Introduction, and least adequate for Reintroduction. The twelve- and seven-year-olds approached ceiling on all three functions. The five-year-olds scored poorly on Reintroduction, and the three-year-olds failed both Introduction and Reintroduction, despite knowledge of at least one of the possible linguistic forms required for these acts as evidenced in a sentence imitation task. Viewed within the framework of Levelt's (1989) discourse model, the data improve our understanding of the developmental period during which children learn to make appropriate presuppositions about the listener's knowledge and attentional states.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JCLen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Languageen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Child Language. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.titleThe development of discourse referencing in Cantonese-speaking childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0305-0009&volume=31&issue=3&spage=633&epage=660&date=2004&atitle=The+Development+of+Discourse+Referencing+in+Cantonese-speaking+Childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, AMY: amywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, AMY=rp00973en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S030500090400604Xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15612393-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-10444269410en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103302en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-10444269410&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage633en_HK
dc.identifier.epage660en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225903800006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, AMY=7403147564en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JR=7403397865en_HK

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