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Article: Electromyographic study of motor learning for a voice production task

TitleElectromyographic study of motor learning for a voice production task
Authors
KeywordsBiofeedback
EMG
Knowledge of performance
Voice therapy
Issue Date2005
PublisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/
Citation
Journal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2005, v. 48 n. 6, p. 1254-1268 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study's broad objective was to examine the effectiveness of surface electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback for motor learning in the voice production domain. The specific objective was to examine whether concurrent or terminal biofeedback would facilitate learning for a relaxed laryngeal musculature task during spoken reading. Method: Twenty-two healthy adult speakers were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. One group received real-time EMG waveform displays of muscle activation from bilateral thyrohyoid sites during reading trials (concurrent feedback group). The other group received static terminal EMG waveform displays about activation levels for the same sites on completion of successive trials (terminal feedback group). All participants were instructed to minimize EMG amplitudes from the thyrohyoid sites during phonation in an oral reading task. Signals were also collected from control, orofacial sites, but participants received neither instructions nor feedback for those sites. Results: The pooled data (2 feedback groups × 2 electrode sites) showed that, overall, muscle activation levels did decrease across baseline, training, and no-feedback test phases. However, no clear evidence was seen of reliable changes in the targeted laryngeal muscle activation levels across the phases, for either the concurrent or the terminal feedback groups. Paradoxically, and entirely unanticipated, reliable decreases were seen in muscle activation for the orofacial, no-feedback control sites. Those decreases were equivalent across concurrent and terminal feedback groups. Conclusions: The unanticipated findings indicate that the provision of biofeedback for a target muscle group facilitated incidental learning in another, untargeted muscle group. Discussion focuses on the possible role of locus of attention in motor learning. Building on literature from other domains, the hypothesis is advanced that attention to muscular contractile force during training trials may suppress intentional learning for attended target sites but may benefit incidental learning for nearby, unattended sites. ©American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84976
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYiu, EMLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVerdolini, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, LPYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:59:23Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:59:23Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2005, v. 48 n. 6, p. 1254-1268en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84976-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study's broad objective was to examine the effectiveness of surface electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback for motor learning in the voice production domain. The specific objective was to examine whether concurrent or terminal biofeedback would facilitate learning for a relaxed laryngeal musculature task during spoken reading. Method: Twenty-two healthy adult speakers were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. One group received real-time EMG waveform displays of muscle activation from bilateral thyrohyoid sites during reading trials (concurrent feedback group). The other group received static terminal EMG waveform displays about activation levels for the same sites on completion of successive trials (terminal feedback group). All participants were instructed to minimize EMG amplitudes from the thyrohyoid sites during phonation in an oral reading task. Signals were also collected from control, orofacial sites, but participants received neither instructions nor feedback for those sites. Results: The pooled data (2 feedback groups × 2 electrode sites) showed that, overall, muscle activation levels did decrease across baseline, training, and no-feedback test phases. However, no clear evidence was seen of reliable changes in the targeted laryngeal muscle activation levels across the phases, for either the concurrent or the terminal feedback groups. Paradoxically, and entirely unanticipated, reliable decreases were seen in muscle activation for the orofacial, no-feedback control sites. Those decreases were equivalent across concurrent and terminal feedback groups. Conclusions: The unanticipated findings indicate that the provision of biofeedback for a target muscle group facilitated incidental learning in another, untargeted muscle group. Discussion focuses on the possible role of locus of attention in motor learning. Building on literature from other domains, the hypothesis is advanced that attention to muscular contractile force during training trials may suppress intentional learning for attended target sites but may benefit incidental learning for nearby, unattended sites. ©American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Researchen_HK
dc.subjectBiofeedbacken_HK
dc.subjectEMGen_HK
dc.subjectKnowledge of performanceen_HK
dc.subjectVoice therapyen_HK
dc.titleElectromyographic study of motor learning for a voice production tasken_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1092-4388&volume=48 &issue=6&spage=1254&epage=1268&date=2005&atitle=Electromyographic+Study+of+Motor+Learning+for+a+Voice+Production+Tasken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYiu, EML: eyiu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, EML=rp00981en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2005/087)en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16478369-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644831132en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros122385en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644831132&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume48en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1254en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1268en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236055900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, EML=7003337895en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVerdolini, K=7004715713en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, LPY=49762844500en_HK

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