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Article: Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide gene expression in the stomach: Revealed by a transgenic mouse study, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining

TitleGlucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide gene expression in the stomach: Revealed by a transgenic mouse study, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining
Authors
KeywordsGIP
Immunohistochemical staining
In situ hybridization
Tissue-specific expression
Transgenic mouse
Issue Date1999
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mce
Citation
Molecular And Cellular Endocrinology, 1999, v. 154 n. 1-2, p. 161-170 How to Cite?
AbstractGlucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) plays an important role in stimulating insulin release in the pancreas as well as inhibiting gastric acid secretion in the stomach. GIP has been found in specific endocrine cells located in the mucosal layer of the small intestine and in the submandibular salivary gland. In this study, the tissue-specific expression of GIP guided by 1.2 kb of the human GIP (hGIP) gene 5' flanking region was investigated by a transgenic mouse approach. A chimeric promoter-reporter gene construct linking the 5'-flanking region of the hGIP gene with the thymidine kinase gene of the herpes simplex virus was introduced into the genomes of mice by microinjection. By reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and thymidine kinase assays, transgene expression was found in the stomach and pancreas. The enzyme activity detected in the stomach was about 6-fold higher than that found in the pancreas, suggesting that GIP may be expressed in the stomach. This observation is supported by RT-PCR studies since both human and mouse GIP transcripts are detected in the stomach and small intestine. In addition, distinct GIP-producing cells were identified in both tissues in mouse by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time that GIP is expressed in human and mouse stomach. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84666
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.859
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.116
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, SSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, BKCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:55:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:55:42Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMolecular And Cellular Endocrinology, 1999, v. 154 n. 1-2, p. 161-170en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0303-7207en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84666-
dc.description.abstractGlucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) plays an important role in stimulating insulin release in the pancreas as well as inhibiting gastric acid secretion in the stomach. GIP has been found in specific endocrine cells located in the mucosal layer of the small intestine and in the submandibular salivary gland. In this study, the tissue-specific expression of GIP guided by 1.2 kb of the human GIP (hGIP) gene 5' flanking region was investigated by a transgenic mouse approach. A chimeric promoter-reporter gene construct linking the 5'-flanking region of the hGIP gene with the thymidine kinase gene of the herpes simplex virus was introduced into the genomes of mice by microinjection. By reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and thymidine kinase assays, transgene expression was found in the stomach and pancreas. The enzyme activity detected in the stomach was about 6-fold higher than that found in the pancreas, suggesting that GIP may be expressed in the stomach. This observation is supported by RT-PCR studies since both human and mouse GIP transcripts are detected in the stomach and small intestine. In addition, distinct GIP-producing cells were identified in both tissues in mouse by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time that GIP is expressed in human and mouse stomach. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mceen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular and Cellular Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.rightsMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectGIPen_HK
dc.subjectImmunohistochemical stainingen_HK
dc.subjectIn situ hybridizationen_HK
dc.subjectTissue-specific expressionen_HK
dc.subjectTransgenic mouseen_HK
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Sequenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGastric Inhibitory Polypeptide - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGene Expressionen_HK
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiceen_HK
dc.subject.meshMice, Transgenicen_HK
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshPancreas - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshPromoter Regions, Geneticen_HK
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reactionen_HK
dc.subject.meshStaining and Labelingen_HK
dc.subject.meshStomach - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshThymidine Kinase - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshTissue Distribution - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTranscription, Geneticen_HK
dc.subject.meshTransgenesen_HK
dc.titleGlucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide gene expression in the stomach: Revealed by a transgenic mouse study, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical stainingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0303-7207&volume=154&spage=161&epage=170&date=1999&atitle=Glucose-dependent+insulinotropic+polypeptide+gene+expression+in+the+stomach:+revealed+by+a+transgenic+mouse+study,+in+situ+hybridization+and+immunohistochemical+stainingen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, SK: skchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, SSM: smchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChow, BKC: bkcc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, SK=rp00381en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, SSM=rp00376en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChow, BKC=rp00681en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0303-7207(99)00106-9en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10509810-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032791158en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros52753en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032791158&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume154en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage161en_HK
dc.identifier.epage170en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000082459800017-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, CM=7201354151en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CKC=35276549400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, SK=7404292976en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, SSM=14120761600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, BKC=7102826193en_HK

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