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Article: Thoracoscopic bullectomy for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in pediatric patients
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TitleThoracoscopic bullectomy for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in pediatric patients
 
AuthorsChung, PHY1
Wong, KKY1
Lan, LCL1
Tam, PKH1
 
KeywordsBullectomy
Pediatrics thoracoscopy
Pleurodesis
Primary spontaneous pneumothorax
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00383/index.htm
 
CitationPediatric Surgery International, 2009, v. 25 n. 9, p. 763-766 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-009-2432-9
 
AbstractIntroduction: Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is a condition that carries significant morbidities and mortalities if not managed properly. Thoracotomy with bullectomy has been the treatment of choice for persistent air leak or recurrence after initial chest drain insertion. With the advancement in minimal invasive surgery, the thoracoscopic approach can dramatically reduce the complications of open thoracotomy. We review our experience in managing spontaneous pneumothorax in children using thoracoscopy. Materials and methods: The medical records of all patients who were discharged with the diagnosis of spontaneous pneumothorax from 1997 to 2007 were reviewed. The demographic data and management were noted. For those patients who underwent thoracoscopic surgery, the intra-operative findings, post-operative outcomes and complications were compared. Results: A total of 15 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax were identified. They all received chest drain insertion as the primary treatment modality. Nine patients, with mean age 16.1 ± 0.9 years, failed the initial management and subsequently received thoracoscopic surgery with a mean interval of 7.6 ± 2.5 days after initial chest drain insertion. Among these patients, bullae were found in seven patients (two patients had more than one bulla). The bullae were excised with mean operative time being 63.9 ± 25.2 min. No conversion to thoracotomy was reported. All patients received paracetamol as pain control and there was no associated complication. No recurrence was found at follow-up till now. Conclusion: This study confirms that the presence of bulla is commonly seen in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who fail initial management. Thoracoscopic bullectomy, a safe and effective operation, should be offered to this group of patients. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.
 
ISSN0179-0358
2013 Impact Factor: 1.061
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-009-2432-9
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000269427600006
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChung, PHY
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKY
 
dc.contributor.authorLan, LCL
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:52:16Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:52:16Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is a condition that carries significant morbidities and mortalities if not managed properly. Thoracotomy with bullectomy has been the treatment of choice for persistent air leak or recurrence after initial chest drain insertion. With the advancement in minimal invasive surgery, the thoracoscopic approach can dramatically reduce the complications of open thoracotomy. We review our experience in managing spontaneous pneumothorax in children using thoracoscopy. Materials and methods: The medical records of all patients who were discharged with the diagnosis of spontaneous pneumothorax from 1997 to 2007 were reviewed. The demographic data and management were noted. For those patients who underwent thoracoscopic surgery, the intra-operative findings, post-operative outcomes and complications were compared. Results: A total of 15 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax were identified. They all received chest drain insertion as the primary treatment modality. Nine patients, with mean age 16.1 ± 0.9 years, failed the initial management and subsequently received thoracoscopic surgery with a mean interval of 7.6 ± 2.5 days after initial chest drain insertion. Among these patients, bullae were found in seven patients (two patients had more than one bulla). The bullae were excised with mean operative time being 63.9 ± 25.2 min. No conversion to thoracotomy was reported. All patients received paracetamol as pain control and there was no associated complication. No recurrence was found at follow-up till now. Conclusion: This study confirms that the presence of bulla is commonly seen in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who fail initial management. Thoracoscopic bullectomy, a safe and effective operation, should be offered to this group of patients. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Surgery International, 2009, v. 25 n. 9, p. 763-766 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-009-2432-9
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5540210
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-009-2432-9
 
dc.identifier.epage766
 
dc.identifier.hkuros164453
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269427600006
 
dc.identifier.issn0179-0358
2013 Impact Factor: 1.061
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19652983
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69549135120
 
dc.identifier.spage763
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84380
 
dc.identifier.volume25
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00383/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Surgery International
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshBlister - pathology - surgery
 
dc.subject.meshChest Tubes
 
dc.subject.meshPneumothorax - surgery
 
dc.subject.meshThoracoscopy
 
dc.subjectBullectomy
 
dc.subjectPediatrics thoracoscopy
 
dc.subjectPleurodesis
 
dc.subjectPrimary spontaneous pneumothorax
 
dc.titleThoracoscopic bullectomy for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in pediatric patients
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Introduction: Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is a condition that carries significant morbidities and mortalities if not managed properly. Thoracotomy with bullectomy has been the treatment of choice for persistent air leak or recurrence after initial chest drain insertion. With the advancement in minimal invasive surgery, the thoracoscopic approach can dramatically reduce the complications of open thoracotomy. We review our experience in managing spontaneous pneumothorax in children using thoracoscopy. Materials and methods: The medical records of all patients who were discharged with the diagnosis of spontaneous pneumothorax from 1997 to 2007 were reviewed. The demographic data and management were noted. For those patients who underwent thoracoscopic surgery, the intra-operative findings, post-operative outcomes and complications were compared. Results: A total of 15 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax were identified. They all received chest drain insertion as the primary treatment modality. Nine patients, with mean age 16.1 &#177; 0.9 years, failed the initial management and subsequently received thoracoscopic surgery with a mean interval of 7.6 &#177; 2.5 days after initial chest drain insertion. Among these patients, bullae were found in seven patients (two patients had more than one bulla). The bullae were excised with mean operative time being 63.9 &#177; 25.2 min. No conversion to thoracotomy was reported. All patients received paracetamol as pain control and there was no associated complication. No recurrence was found at follow-up till now. Conclusion: This study confirms that the presence of bulla is commonly seen in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who fail initial management. Thoracoscopic bullectomy, a safe and effective operation, should be offered to this group of patients. &#169; 2009 Springer-Verlag.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong