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Article: A head and neck cancer patient dies! Why perform an autopsy: For the relatives, for the clinicians or for the pathologists?

TitleA head and neck cancer patient dies! Why perform an autopsy: For the relatives, for the clinicians or for the pathologists?
Authors
KeywordsAutopsy
Head and neck cancer
Issue Date2003
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00016489.asp
Citation
Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 2003, v. 123 n. 3, p. 348-354 How to Cite?
AbstractIt is no secret that autopsy rates at most hospitals worldwide - both teaching and community hospitals - have declined precipitously in recent decades, but is this a desirable state of affairs? This article explores this issue from three viewpoints: that of the family members who grant permission for autopsies; that of the clinicians who seek permission for the autopsy to be carried out; and that of the pathologists who actually perform the post-mortem examination. Family concerns about (the sometimes tangential) matter of organ retention following autopsy have recently been highlighted in Europe, with an accompanying negative overall impression of the autopsy being conveyed by many outlets of the popular media. Clinicians will often concede that they feel somewhat distanced from the whole process of autopsy, and so do not hold it in such high esteem as their predecessors once did decades ago. Pathologists at present often perform autopsies as "additional duties" to be fitted in around their central functions, and so do not see them as a primary task to be accomplished. However, there are reasons why this may be detrimental to patient care, including in particular the fact that clinical/radiographic diagnoses are sometimes not confirmed by the results of a complete autopsy. Suggestions for improving the autopsy rate - in particular amongst head and neck cancer patients - are discussed, and include performance of a more rapid limited autopsy and the designation of specialist pathologists in head and neck cancer to carry out autopsies of these patients as an extension of their clinical duties. One conclusion seems inescapable: to increase autopsy rates, the status of the procedure will necessarily have to be upgraded from that of "afterthought/perfunctory task" to that of "consultation", with all of the shifts in attitude such a modification would entail.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84177
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.127
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.666
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBradley, PJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFerlito, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLowe, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDevaney, KOen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRinaldo, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:49:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:49:52Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationActa Oto-Laryngologica, 2003, v. 123 n. 3, p. 348-354en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0001-6489en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84177-
dc.description.abstractIt is no secret that autopsy rates at most hospitals worldwide - both teaching and community hospitals - have declined precipitously in recent decades, but is this a desirable state of affairs? This article explores this issue from three viewpoints: that of the family members who grant permission for autopsies; that of the clinicians who seek permission for the autopsy to be carried out; and that of the pathologists who actually perform the post-mortem examination. Family concerns about (the sometimes tangential) matter of organ retention following autopsy have recently been highlighted in Europe, with an accompanying negative overall impression of the autopsy being conveyed by many outlets of the popular media. Clinicians will often concede that they feel somewhat distanced from the whole process of autopsy, and so do not hold it in such high esteem as their predecessors once did decades ago. Pathologists at present often perform autopsies as "additional duties" to be fitted in around their central functions, and so do not see them as a primary task to be accomplished. However, there are reasons why this may be detrimental to patient care, including in particular the fact that clinical/radiographic diagnoses are sometimes not confirmed by the results of a complete autopsy. Suggestions for improving the autopsy rate - in particular amongst head and neck cancer patients - are discussed, and include performance of a more rapid limited autopsy and the designation of specialist pathologists in head and neck cancer to carry out autopsies of these patients as an extension of their clinical duties. One conclusion seems inescapable: to increase autopsy rates, the status of the procedure will necessarily have to be upgraded from that of "afterthought/perfunctory task" to that of "consultation", with all of the shifts in attitude such a modification would entail.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00016489.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofActa Oto-Laryngologicaen_HK
dc.rightsActa Oto-Laryngologica. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.en_HK
dc.subjectAutopsyen_HK
dc.subjectHead and neck canceren_HK
dc.titleA head and neck cancer patient dies! Why perform an autopsy: For the relatives, for the clinicians or for the pathologists?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0001-6489&volume=123&spage=348&epage=354&date=2003&atitle=A+head+and+neck+cancer+patient+dies!+Why+perform+an+autopsy:+for+the+relatives,+for+the+clinicians+or+for+the+pathologistsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0036554021000001349en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12737289-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037274360en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros76234en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037274360&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume123en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage348en_HK
dc.identifier.epage354en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182665700003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBradley, PJ=7201849948en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFerlito, A=7102481468en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLowe, J=25952877100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDevaney, KO=7004569909en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRinaldo, A=7103192494en_HK

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