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Article: Foreign body ingestion in children: experience with 1,265 cases

TitleForeign body ingestion in children: experience with 1,265 cases
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpedsurg
Citation
Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 1999, v. 34, p. 1427-1476 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground/Purpose: This Study Aims To Elucidate The Clinical Presentation, The Effectiveness Of Investigations, And Treatment Of Foreign Body Ingestion In Children And To Formulate An Algorithm Of Management. Methods: The Records Of Children Admitted To A Single Institution Who Had A History Of Foreign Body Ingestion Over 33 Years Were Reviewed. Symptoms, Radiological Findings, And Endoscopic Findings Were Assessed. Results: Foreign Bodies Were Detected In 552 (43%) Of The 1,265 Children Admitted. The Age Of The Children Ranged From 6 Months To 16 Years (Mean, 5.2 Years). The Preschool Toddlers (Mean Age, 3.8 Years) Were Most Prone To Ingest Inanimate Objects. The Most Common Objects Were Coins (49%) And Nonmetallic Sharp Objects (Nmso; 31%). Although X-Rays Could Detect All The Metallic Objects And 86% Of Glass Objects, The Sensitivity Of Fish Bone Detection Is Only 26%. Absence Of Symptoms Was Common (50% In Metallic Group And 29% In Nmso Group). Forty-One Percent Of Coins And 95% Of Nmso Were Lodged At Sites Suitable For Removal By Direct Laryngoscopy Alone With Success Rates Of 86% And 77%, Respectively. There Were 3 Disease-Related Complications And 1 Mortality. Two Of These Children Were Mentally Retarded And Presented Late. Conclusions: Efforts For Prevention Of Ingestion Of Inanimate Foreign Body Should Focus On The Preschool Toddler Group. Particular Attention Should Be Paid To Mentally Retarded Children With Vague Gastrointestinal Symptoms. Absence Of Symptoms Does Not Preclude Presence Of Foreign Body In Children. Children With History Of Nmso Ingestion Should Undergo Direct Laryngoscopy Despite Negative Radiological Finding, Both As A Screening Procedure Or Treatment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84159
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.733
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.802
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:49:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:49:39Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Pediatric Surgery, 1999, v. 34, p. 1427-1476en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-3468en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84159-
dc.description.abstractBackground/Purpose: This Study Aims To Elucidate The Clinical Presentation, The Effectiveness Of Investigations, And Treatment Of Foreign Body Ingestion In Children And To Formulate An Algorithm Of Management. Methods: The Records Of Children Admitted To A Single Institution Who Had A History Of Foreign Body Ingestion Over 33 Years Were Reviewed. Symptoms, Radiological Findings, And Endoscopic Findings Were Assessed. Results: Foreign Bodies Were Detected In 552 (43%) Of The 1,265 Children Admitted. The Age Of The Children Ranged From 6 Months To 16 Years (Mean, 5.2 Years). The Preschool Toddlers (Mean Age, 3.8 Years) Were Most Prone To Ingest Inanimate Objects. The Most Common Objects Were Coins (49%) And Nonmetallic Sharp Objects (Nmso; 31%). Although X-Rays Could Detect All The Metallic Objects And 86% Of Glass Objects, The Sensitivity Of Fish Bone Detection Is Only 26%. Absence Of Symptoms Was Common (50% In Metallic Group And 29% In Nmso Group). Forty-One Percent Of Coins And 95% Of Nmso Were Lodged At Sites Suitable For Removal By Direct Laryngoscopy Alone With Success Rates Of 86% And 77%, Respectively. There Were 3 Disease-Related Complications And 1 Mortality. Two Of These Children Were Mentally Retarded And Presented Late. Conclusions: Efforts For Prevention Of Ingestion Of Inanimate Foreign Body Should Focus On The Preschool Toddler Group. Particular Attention Should Be Paid To Mentally Retarded Children With Vague Gastrointestinal Symptoms. Absence Of Symptoms Does Not Preclude Presence Of Foreign Body In Children. Children With History Of Nmso Ingestion Should Undergo Direct Laryngoscopy Despite Negative Radiological Finding, Both As A Screening Procedure Or Treatment.en_US
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpedsurgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pediatric Surgeryen_HK
dc.titleForeign body ingestion in children: experience with 1,265 casesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-3468&volume=34&spage=1427&epage=1476&date=1999&atitle=Foreign+body+ingestion+in+children:+experience+with+1,265+casesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheng, W: weicheng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTam, PKH: paultam@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTam, PKH=rp00060en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0022-3468(99)90106-9en_US
dc.identifier.pmid10549750-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032720613en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros47274en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032720613&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1472en_US
dc.identifier.epage1476en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000083310700007-

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