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Conference Paper: Living-donor liver transplantation for high-urgency situations

TitleLiving-donor liver transplantation for high-urgency situations
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.com
Citation
Transplantation, 2003, v. 75 n. 3 SUPPL., p. S33-S36 How to Cite?
AbstractPatients in high-urgency situations for liver transplantation have a high mortality rate while on the waiting list for cadaveric grafts. In countries where cadaveric organ donation is scarce, the use of living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) provides the only chance of survival for both pediatric and adult patients. It results in a satisfactory overall survival, from approximately 60% to 75% in pediatric patients and from 70% to 90% in adult patients. Patients who had early LDLT were shown to have a better survival outcome than those who waited for cadaveric organ donation, because a timely graft was available to them before they deteriorated further to multiple organ failure. Patients who were in high-urgency situations for liver transplantation and opted for LDLT were also shown to have significantly better survival outcomes than those who did not opt for this procedure. Although left lobe liver graft can be used successfully in adult-to-adult LDLT in high-urgency situations, there is a trend toward a more frequent use of the larger mass provided by the right lobe of the liver. Adequate venous drainage of the anterior segment of the right lobe liver graft is also considered essential for the favorable outcome of the recipients. Although donor morbidity has been reported to be low in LDLT and no donor death has been reported from Asian transplant centers, standardized definitions of morbidity and better methods for observing and measuring outcomes are necessary to understand and to potentially reduce morbidity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84140
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.69
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.699
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, STen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:49:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:49:25Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTransplantation, 2003, v. 75 n. 3 SUPPL., p. S33-S36en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0041-1337en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84140-
dc.description.abstractPatients in high-urgency situations for liver transplantation have a high mortality rate while on the waiting list for cadaveric grafts. In countries where cadaveric organ donation is scarce, the use of living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) provides the only chance of survival for both pediatric and adult patients. It results in a satisfactory overall survival, from approximately 60% to 75% in pediatric patients and from 70% to 90% in adult patients. Patients who had early LDLT were shown to have a better survival outcome than those who waited for cadaveric organ donation, because a timely graft was available to them before they deteriorated further to multiple organ failure. Patients who were in high-urgency situations for liver transplantation and opted for LDLT were also shown to have significantly better survival outcomes than those who did not opt for this procedure. Although left lobe liver graft can be used successfully in adult-to-adult LDLT in high-urgency situations, there is a trend toward a more frequent use of the larger mass provided by the right lobe of the liver. Adequate venous drainage of the anterior segment of the right lobe liver graft is also considered essential for the favorable outcome of the recipients. Although donor morbidity has been reported to be low in LDLT and no donor death has been reported from Asian transplant centers, standardized definitions of morbidity and better methods for observing and measuring outcomes are necessary to understand and to potentially reduce morbidity.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTransplantationen_HK
dc.rightsTransplantation. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.titleLiving-donor liver transplantation for high-urgency situationsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0041-1337&volume=75&spage=S33&epage=S36&date=2003&atitle=Living-donor+liver+transplantation+for+high-urgency+situationsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFan, ST: stfan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, CM: chungmlo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, J: jwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFan, ST=rp00355en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, CM=rp00412en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, J=rp00322en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.TP.0000047031.65448.47-
dc.identifier.pmid12589137-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037442081en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros77125en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037442081&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume75en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3 SUPPL.en_HK
dc.identifier.spageS33en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS36en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181167000011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, CL=7409789712en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, ST=7402678224en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, CM=7401771672en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=8049324500en_HK

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