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Article: Patient safety in the undergraduate curriculum: Medical students' perception

TitlePatient safety in the undergraduate curriculum: Medical students' perception
Authors
KeywordsCurriculum
Education
Medical
Medical errors
Safety management
Students
Undergraduate
Issue Date2010
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2010, v. 16 n. 2, p. 101-105 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective Patient safety has emerged as a distinct health care discipline and an undergraduate programme on patient safety is being introduced at the authors' institution. The present study aimed to assess medical students' perceptions and knowledge on patient safety issues. Design A self-administered voluntary questionnaire survey. Setting Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Participants A total of 130 fourth-year medical students. Main outcome measures Students' baseline perceptions and knowledge on patient safety issues. Results The majority of students agreed that medical errors were inevitable but over 25% opined that "competent physicians do not make errors". The majority disapproved the practice of nondisclosure of error; whilst 6% would not address 'near-miss' events, and almost 10% did not support an active reporting system. Nearly half of the students were neutral on the notion that uncertainty should not be tolerated in patient care, and over 80% agreed that the most effective strategy to prevent error was "to work harder and be more careful". A knowledge gap in patient safety issues existed. Over 80% of students supported the introduction of our new undergraduate programme. Conclusion Medical students were aware of medical errors being an inevitable barrier between intended 'best care' and what was actually provided to patients. Students appeared to lack the appreciation of non-physician-based causes of errors, and the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of incidents. A formal curriculum on patient safety is urgently needed in this locality, and such an initiative was supported by the medical students who were surveyed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84039
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPatil, NGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:48:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:48:12Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2010, v. 16 n. 2, p. 101-105en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84039-
dc.description.abstractObjective Patient safety has emerged as a distinct health care discipline and an undergraduate programme on patient safety is being introduced at the authors' institution. The present study aimed to assess medical students' perceptions and knowledge on patient safety issues. Design A self-administered voluntary questionnaire survey. Setting Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Participants A total of 130 fourth-year medical students. Main outcome measures Students' baseline perceptions and knowledge on patient safety issues. Results The majority of students agreed that medical errors were inevitable but over 25% opined that "competent physicians do not make errors". The majority disapproved the practice of nondisclosure of error; whilst 6% would not address 'near-miss' events, and almost 10% did not support an active reporting system. Nearly half of the students were neutral on the notion that uncertainty should not be tolerated in patient care, and over 80% agreed that the most effective strategy to prevent error was "to work harder and be more careful". A knowledge gap in patient safety issues existed. Over 80% of students supported the introduction of our new undergraduate programme. Conclusion Medical students were aware of medical errors being an inevitable barrier between intended 'best care' and what was actually provided to patients. Students appeared to lack the appreciation of non-physician-based causes of errors, and the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of incidents. A formal curriculum on patient safety is urgently needed in this locality, and such an initiative was supported by the medical students who were surveyed.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.en_HK
dc.subjectCurriculumen_HK
dc.subjectEducationen_HK
dc.subjectMedicalen_HK
dc.subjectMedical errorsen_HK
dc.subjectSafety managementen_HK
dc.subjectStudentsen_HK
dc.subjectUndergraduateen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshCurriculum-
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice-
dc.subject.meshMedical Errors - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical - psychology-
dc.titlePatient safety in the undergraduate curriculum: Medical students' perceptionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1024-2708&volume=16&issue=2&spage=101&epage=105&date=2010&atitle=Patient+safety+in+the+undergraduate+curriculum:+medical+students%27+perceptionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GKK: gilberto@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPatil, NG: ngpatil@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GKK=rp00522en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPatil, NG=rp00388en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.pmid20354243-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954529683en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169803en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954529683&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage101en_HK
dc.identifier.epage105en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GKK=35965118200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPatil, NG=7103152514en_HK

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