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Article: Primary biliary stones: Diagnosis and management

TitlePrimary biliary stones: Diagnosis and management
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00268/
Citation
World Journal Of Surgery, 1998, v. 22 n. 11, p. 1162-1166 How to Cite?
AbstractTo review the results of treatment of primary biliary stones, 96 consecutive patients managed from 1991 to 1996 were studied retrospectively. Acute cholangitis and abdominal pain were the presenting symptoms in 57 patients (59%) and 29 patients (30%), respectively. Fifty-four patients (56%) had a history of biliary surgery. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, ultrasonography, and computed tomography were frequently employed for diagnosis of primary biliary stones and were performed on 84 patients (88%), 90 patients (94%), and 89 patients (93%), respectively. Intrahepatic stones were identified in 91 patients (95%) and biliary strictures in 34 patients (35%). Concomitant cholangiocarcinoma occurred in 15 patients (16%). Hepatic resection was required in 55 patients (57%) for removal of an atrophic liver lobe or a segment related to repeated infection, biliary strictures, liver abscesses, or cholangiocarcinoma. Intraoperative choledochoscopy was routinely performed in all patients to detect, remove, or confirm clearance of biliary stones. A hepaticocutaneous jejunostomy (HCJ) was constructed in 70 patients (73%) to facilitate postoperative choledochoscopic examination or biliary stone extraction. Twenty-two patients (23%) had residual stones and required postoperative choledochoscopic extraction. Complete eradication of residual stones was achieved in all patients. Postoperative morbidity occurred in 28 patients (29%), and there was one hospital death (a patient with cholangiocarcinoma). With a median follow-up of 26 months (range 2-62 months), stones recurred in three patients. In conclusion, the early results of treatment of primary biliary stones were satisfactory owing to a systematic, aggressive approach that consisted of hepatic resection, frequent construction of an HCJ, and postoperative choledochoscopy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84021
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.523
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.375
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, STen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:47:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:47:59Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal Of Surgery, 1998, v. 22 n. 11, p. 1162-1166en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84021-
dc.description.abstractTo review the results of treatment of primary biliary stones, 96 consecutive patients managed from 1991 to 1996 were studied retrospectively. Acute cholangitis and abdominal pain were the presenting symptoms in 57 patients (59%) and 29 patients (30%), respectively. Fifty-four patients (56%) had a history of biliary surgery. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, ultrasonography, and computed tomography were frequently employed for diagnosis of primary biliary stones and were performed on 84 patients (88%), 90 patients (94%), and 89 patients (93%), respectively. Intrahepatic stones were identified in 91 patients (95%) and biliary strictures in 34 patients (35%). Concomitant cholangiocarcinoma occurred in 15 patients (16%). Hepatic resection was required in 55 patients (57%) for removal of an atrophic liver lobe or a segment related to repeated infection, biliary strictures, liver abscesses, or cholangiocarcinoma. Intraoperative choledochoscopy was routinely performed in all patients to detect, remove, or confirm clearance of biliary stones. A hepaticocutaneous jejunostomy (HCJ) was constructed in 70 patients (73%) to facilitate postoperative choledochoscopic examination or biliary stone extraction. Twenty-two patients (23%) had residual stones and required postoperative choledochoscopic extraction. Complete eradication of residual stones was achieved in all patients. Postoperative morbidity occurred in 28 patients (29%), and there was one hospital death (a patient with cholangiocarcinoma). With a median follow-up of 26 months (range 2-62 months), stones recurred in three patients. In conclusion, the early results of treatment of primary biliary stones were satisfactory owing to a systematic, aggressive approach that consisted of hepatic resection, frequent construction of an HCJ, and postoperative choledochoscopy.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00268/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Surgeryen_HK
dc.titlePrimary biliary stones: Diagnosis and managementen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0364-2313&volume=22&spage=1162&epage=1166&date=1998&atitle=Primary+biliary+stones:+diagnosis+and+managementen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFan, ST: stfan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, J: jwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFan, ST=rp00355en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, J=rp00322en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s002689900536en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9828725-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031662887en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros39212en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031662887&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1162en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1166en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000076315200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, CL=7409789712en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, ST=7402678224en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=8049324500en_HK

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