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Article: Association of the CD134/CD134L costimulatory pathway with acute rejection of small bowel allograft
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TitleAssociation of the CD134/CD134L costimulatory pathway with acute rejection of small bowel allograft
 
AuthorsTian, L1
Guo, W1
Yuan, Z1
Lui, VCH1
Chan, JKY1
Yagita, H1
Akiba, H1
Dallman, M1
Tam, PKH1
 
Issue Date2002
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.com
 
CitationTransplantation, 2002, v. 74 n. 1, p. 133-138 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractBackground. The CD134/CD134L interaction provides a strong costimulatory signal that is CD28-independent. The CD134/CD134L pathway has been studied in inflammatory, autoimmune diseases, and graft-versus-host disease, but no information exists on the involvement of CD134/CD134L interactions in solid organ transplantation. Methods. CD134/CD134L costimulation was studied in a rat model of small bowel transplantation. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry were used to analyze the expression and localization of CD134/ CD134L. Mixed lymphocyte culture and quantitative RT-PCR were used to measure the effect on T proliferation and T helper cell cytokine transcripts of single or combined CD134 and CD28 costimulatory blockade. Results. CD134 and CD134L molecules were strongly expressed in acutely rejected small bowel allografts. This expression was significantly suppressed by FK506. Interruption of the CD134 and CD28 costimulatory pathways resulted in an pronounced increase in expression of interleukin-10 transcripts. Conclusion. These results present the first evidence that the CD134/CD134L interaction is associated with acute allograft rejection. Combined CD134/CD134L blockade may be an effective treatment to both prevent acute allograft rejection and promote the induction of cells with regulatory capacity.
 
ISSN0041-1337
2013 Impact Factor: 3.535
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.609
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000176998100024
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTian, L
 
dc.contributor.authorGuo, W
 
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorLui, VCH
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, JKY
 
dc.contributor.authorYagita, H
 
dc.contributor.authorAkiba, H
 
dc.contributor.authorDallman, M
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:47:06Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:47:06Z
 
dc.date.issued2002
 
dc.description.abstractBackground. The CD134/CD134L interaction provides a strong costimulatory signal that is CD28-independent. The CD134/CD134L pathway has been studied in inflammatory, autoimmune diseases, and graft-versus-host disease, but no information exists on the involvement of CD134/CD134L interactions in solid organ transplantation. Methods. CD134/CD134L costimulation was studied in a rat model of small bowel transplantation. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry were used to analyze the expression and localization of CD134/ CD134L. Mixed lymphocyte culture and quantitative RT-PCR were used to measure the effect on T proliferation and T helper cell cytokine transcripts of single or combined CD134 and CD28 costimulatory blockade. Results. CD134 and CD134L molecules were strongly expressed in acutely rejected small bowel allografts. This expression was significantly suppressed by FK506. Interruption of the CD134 and CD28 costimulatory pathways resulted in an pronounced increase in expression of interleukin-10 transcripts. Conclusion. These results present the first evidence that the CD134/CD134L interaction is associated with acute allograft rejection. Combined CD134/CD134L blockade may be an effective treatment to both prevent acute allograft rejection and promote the induction of cells with regulatory capacity.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationTransplantation, 2002, v. 74 n. 1, p. 133-138 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage138
 
dc.identifier.hkuros70996
 
dc.identifier.hkuros75799
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000176998100024
 
dc.identifier.issn0041-1337
2013 Impact Factor: 3.535
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.609
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid12134113
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037099452
 
dc.identifier.spage133
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83947
 
dc.identifier.volume74
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofTransplantation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsTransplantation. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
 
dc.titleAssociation of the CD134/CD134L costimulatory pathway with acute rejection of small bowel allograft
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chan, JKY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yagita, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Akiba, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Dallman, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, PKH</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong