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Article: Umbilical hernia in adults: Laparoscopic vs open repair

TitleUmbilical hernia in adults: Laparoscopic vs open repair
Authors
KeywordsHerniorrhaphy
Laparoscopy
Umbilical hernia
Issue Date2003
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2003, v. 17 n. 12, p. 2016-2020 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: There is no consensus on the best technique for the repair of umbilical hernia in adults. The role of laparoscopic hernioplasty of umbilical hernia remains controversial. This study was undertaken to compare the outcomes of open and laparoscopic onlay patch repair of umbilical hernia in adults. Methods: From January 1996 to December 2002, 102 patients underwent elective repair of umbilical hernia. Operative techniques included Mayo repair (n = 43), laparoscopic onlay Gore-Tex patch hernioplasty (n = 26), suture herniorrhaphy (n = 24), and mesh hernioplasty (n = 9). Results: Demographic features and risk factors were similar among the four groups. The operative time of laparoscopic hernioplasty (median, 66 min) was significantly longer than those for patients who underwent Mayo repair (60 min) or sutured herniorrhaphy (50 min) (p < 0.05). None of the patients who underwent laparoscopic patch repairs required conversion to open repair. The median pain score at rest on postoperative day 1 was significantly lower in patients who underwent laparoscopic repair compared to those who had Mayo repair. A significantly shorter hospital stay and a lower wound morbidity rate were also observed in patients who underwent laparoscopic repair. With a mean follow-up of 2 years, suture herniorrhaphy had a relatively high recurrence rate (8.7%), whereas no recurrence was documented for the other techniques. Conclusions: Laparoscopic onlay patch hernioplasty is a safe and efficacious technique for the repair of umbilical hernia. Compared to Mayo repair, the laparoscopic approach confers the advantages of reduced postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, and a diminished morbidity rate.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83891
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPatil, NGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:46:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:46:27Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2003, v. 17 n. 12, p. 2016-2020en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83891-
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is no consensus on the best technique for the repair of umbilical hernia in adults. The role of laparoscopic hernioplasty of umbilical hernia remains controversial. This study was undertaken to compare the outcomes of open and laparoscopic onlay patch repair of umbilical hernia in adults. Methods: From January 1996 to December 2002, 102 patients underwent elective repair of umbilical hernia. Operative techniques included Mayo repair (n = 43), laparoscopic onlay Gore-Tex patch hernioplasty (n = 26), suture herniorrhaphy (n = 24), and mesh hernioplasty (n = 9). Results: Demographic features and risk factors were similar among the four groups. The operative time of laparoscopic hernioplasty (median, 66 min) was significantly longer than those for patients who underwent Mayo repair (60 min) or sutured herniorrhaphy (50 min) (p < 0.05). None of the patients who underwent laparoscopic patch repairs required conversion to open repair. The median pain score at rest on postoperative day 1 was significantly lower in patients who underwent laparoscopic repair compared to those who had Mayo repair. A significantly shorter hospital stay and a lower wound morbidity rate were also observed in patients who underwent laparoscopic repair. With a mean follow-up of 2 years, suture herniorrhaphy had a relatively high recurrence rate (8.7%), whereas no recurrence was documented for the other techniques. Conclusions: Laparoscopic onlay patch hernioplasty is a safe and efficacious technique for the repair of umbilical hernia. Compared to Mayo repair, the laparoscopic approach confers the advantages of reduced postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, and a diminished morbidity rate.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniquesen_HK
dc.subjectHerniorrhaphyen_HK
dc.subjectLaparoscopyen_HK
dc.subjectUmbilical herniaen_HK
dc.titleUmbilical hernia in adults: Laparoscopic vs open repairen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0930-2794&volume=17 &issue=12&spage=2016&epage=2020&date=2003&atitle=Umbilical+hernia+in+adultsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPatil, NG: ngpatil@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPatil, NG=rp00388en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-003-9027-7en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid14574545-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0347662376en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87781en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0347662376&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2016en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2020en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220310100027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, H=7201497812en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPatil, NG=7103152514en_HK

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