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Article: Sonic hedgehog promotes CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and modulates the expression of a subset of CD28-targeted genes
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TitleSonic hedgehog promotes CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and modulates the expression of a subset of CD28-targeted genes
 
AuthorsChan, VSF2
Chau, SY2
Tian, L2 3
Chen, Y2
Kwong, SKY1
Quackenbush, J1
Dallman, M5
Lamb, J4
Tam, PKH2
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://intimm.oxfordjournals.org/
 
CitationInternational Immunology, 2006, v. 18 n. 12, p. 1627-1636 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intimm/dxl096
 
AbstractSonic hedgehog (Shh) is a crucial morphogen in the development of numerous tissues and organs, including the nervous system, gastrointestinal tract and lung. Recent findings suggest that Shh plays an important role in thymocyte development and peripheral T cell function. Here we report that the Shh receptors, patched and smoothened, are expressed in resting and activated T cells and their expression is regulated upon T cell activation. Shh protein is also detected on the surface of freshly isolated T cells. Although exogenous Shh alone does not activate resting T cells, it exhibits co-stimulatory activity which is reflected in its ability to potentiate CD3-mediated proliferation and cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. The co-stimulatory effect is most prominent at sub-optimal TCR stimulation level. Gene expression analysis reveals that Shh signaling in CD4+ T cells modulates a different set of transcriptional targets from that in neuronal cells. Furthermore, Shh co-stimulation modulates the expression of a subset of CD28-responsive genes, including cyclin A and B cell translocation gene 2. © 2006 Oxford University Press.
 
ISSN0953-8178
2013 Impact Factor: 3.181
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intimm/dxl096
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000242716500001
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, VSF
 
dc.contributor.authorChau, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorTian, L
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorKwong, SKY
 
dc.contributor.authorQuackenbush, J
 
dc.contributor.authorDallman, M
 
dc.contributor.authorLamb, J
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:46:13Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:46:13Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractSonic hedgehog (Shh) is a crucial morphogen in the development of numerous tissues and organs, including the nervous system, gastrointestinal tract and lung. Recent findings suggest that Shh plays an important role in thymocyte development and peripheral T cell function. Here we report that the Shh receptors, patched and smoothened, are expressed in resting and activated T cells and their expression is regulated upon T cell activation. Shh protein is also detected on the surface of freshly isolated T cells. Although exogenous Shh alone does not activate resting T cells, it exhibits co-stimulatory activity which is reflected in its ability to potentiate CD3-mediated proliferation and cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. The co-stimulatory effect is most prominent at sub-optimal TCR stimulation level. Gene expression analysis reveals that Shh signaling in CD4+ T cells modulates a different set of transcriptional targets from that in neuronal cells. Furthermore, Shh co-stimulation modulates the expression of a subset of CD28-responsive genes, including cyclin A and B cell translocation gene 2. © 2006 Oxford University Press.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Immunology, 2006, v. 18 n. 12, p. 1627-1636 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intimm/dxl096
 
dc.identifier.citeulike970030
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intimm/dxl096
 
dc.identifier.epage1636
 
dc.identifier.hkuros137862
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242716500001
 
dc.identifier.issn0953-8178
2013 Impact Factor: 3.181
 
dc.identifier.issue12
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid17005629
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845360508
 
dc.identifier.spage1627
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83871
 
dc.identifier.volume18
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://intimm.oxfordjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Immunology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD28 - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshCD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
 
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulation
 
dc.subject.meshHedgehog Proteins - metabolism - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshLymphocyte Activation
 
dc.titleSonic hedgehog promotes CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and modulates the expression of a subset of CD28-targeted genes
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chen, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kwong, SKY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Quackenbush, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Dallman, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lamb, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, PKH</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Institute for Genome Research
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. University of Sydney
  4. GlaxoSmithKline
  5. Imperial College London