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Article: Fibrosis progression in chronic hepatitis C patients with occult hepatitis B co-infection

TitleFibrosis progression in chronic hepatitis C patients with occult hepatitis B co-infection
Authors
KeywordsChronic hepatitis B infection
Chronic hepatitis C infection
Liver cirrhosis
Occult hepatitis B infection
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcv
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Virology, 2006, v. 35 n. 2, p. 185-192 How to Cite?
AbstractOccult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in individuals without hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) can be identified in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients. However, its role in fibrosis progression remains uncertain. This retrospective study compared the fibrosis progression (defined as fibrosis progression by at least one stage) and progression to severe fibrosis (fibrosis stage 3 or 4) in HCV patients with occult HBV infection. Occult HBV infection was diagnosed by the detection of HBV DNA in the serum of 74 consecutive anti-HCV positive patients by PCR. Thirty-one patients (41.9%) had occult HBV infection. All 74 patients had a median of 2 (range 2-3) liver biopsies. The median time between the first and last liver biopsy was 57.7 (range 15.0-132.8) months. Eleven of the 31 patients with occult HBV infection compared with 12 of the 43 patients without occult HBV infection had fibrosis progression (35.5% versus 27.9%, respectively, p = 0.608). Six of the 31 patients with occult HBV infection compared with 8 of the 43 patients without occult HBV infection developed severe fibrosis (19.4% versus 18.6%, respectively, p = 0.946). In conclusion, chronic HCV patients with occult HBV co-infection does not seem to progress more than patients without occult HBV infection. However, more large-scale studies are needed before a definite conclusion can be obtained. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83727
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.647
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.503
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMonto, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKim, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, GKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWright, TLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:44:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:44:30Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Virology, 2006, v. 35 n. 2, p. 185-192en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1386-6532en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83727-
dc.description.abstractOccult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in individuals without hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) can be identified in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients. However, its role in fibrosis progression remains uncertain. This retrospective study compared the fibrosis progression (defined as fibrosis progression by at least one stage) and progression to severe fibrosis (fibrosis stage 3 or 4) in HCV patients with occult HBV infection. Occult HBV infection was diagnosed by the detection of HBV DNA in the serum of 74 consecutive anti-HCV positive patients by PCR. Thirty-one patients (41.9%) had occult HBV infection. All 74 patients had a median of 2 (range 2-3) liver biopsies. The median time between the first and last liver biopsy was 57.7 (range 15.0-132.8) months. Eleven of the 31 patients with occult HBV infection compared with 12 of the 43 patients without occult HBV infection had fibrosis progression (35.5% versus 27.9%, respectively, p = 0.608). Six of the 31 patients with occult HBV infection compared with 8 of the 43 patients without occult HBV infection developed severe fibrosis (19.4% versus 18.6%, respectively, p = 0.946). In conclusion, chronic HCV patients with occult HBV co-infection does not seem to progress more than patients without occult HBV infection. However, more large-scale studies are needed before a definite conclusion can be obtained. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Virology. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectChronic hepatitis B infectionen_HK
dc.subjectChronic hepatitis C infectionen_HK
dc.subjectLiver cirrhosisen_HK
dc.subjectOccult hepatitis B infectionen_HK
dc.titleFibrosis progression in chronic hepatitis C patients with occult hepatitis B co-infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1386-6532&volume=35&spage=185&epage=192&date=2005&atitle=Fibrosis+progression+in+chronic+hepatitis+C+patients+with+occult+hepatitis+b+co-infectionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, JM: jmluk@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, JM=rp00349en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jcv.2005.07.003en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16103008en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-30144442788en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros100648en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-30144442788&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume35en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage185en_HK
dc.identifier.epage192en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235387100011-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, CK=35082057900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, E=36631358500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, H=10939206000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMonto, A=7004552301en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKim, M=36006959500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, JM=7006777791en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, GK=7102301257en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWright, TL=7402187126en_HK

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