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Article: Minimum graft size for successful living donor liver transplantation
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TitleMinimum graft size for successful living donor liver transplantation
 
AuthorsLo, CM1
Fan, ST1
Liu, CL1
Chan, JK1
Lam, BK1
Lau, GK1
Wei, WI1
Wong, J1
 
Issue Date1999
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.com
 
CitationTransplantation, 1999, v. 68 n. 8, p. 1112-1116 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199910270-00009
 
AbstractBackground. The extension of living donor liver transplantation to adult recipients is limited by the adequacy of the size of the graft. We evaluate the effect of the graft size on the survival of the recipient in order to establish a clinical guide for the minimum requirement. Methods. The clinical records of 14 adults and 11 children (body weight 6.1-100 kg) who underwent living donor liver transplantation for chronic or acute liver failure were reviewed. The effect of the graft weight ratio (graft weight divided by standard liver weight of recipient) on graft function and survival was studied. Results. The graft weight ratio ranged from 31 to 203%. The overall graft and patient survival rates were 84% at a median follow-up of 29 months. The survival rate was 95% for recipients with a graft weight ratio >40%, and 40% only for those with a ratio ≤40% (P=0.016). It was 88% (7/8) when the ratio was >100%, 100% (5/5) when the ratio was 71 to 100%, 100% (7/7) when the ratio was 41 to 70%, and 40% (2/5) only when the ratio was ≤40%. When the graft weight ratio was ≤40%, early graft dysfunction was evident and contributed to the causes of death in three patients. Conclusions. Preoperative computed tomographic measurement of liver size of a living donor is essential. A graft that represented 40% or less of the recipient's standard liver weight should be regarded as a marginal graft with a lower success rate.
 
ISSN0041-1337
2012 Impact Factor: 3.781
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.521
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199910270-00009
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000083496600009
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, ST
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, JK
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, BK
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, GK
 
dc.contributor.authorWei, WI
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:43:47Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:43:47Z
 
dc.date.issued1999
 
dc.description.abstractBackground. The extension of living donor liver transplantation to adult recipients is limited by the adequacy of the size of the graft. We evaluate the effect of the graft size on the survival of the recipient in order to establish a clinical guide for the minimum requirement. Methods. The clinical records of 14 adults and 11 children (body weight 6.1-100 kg) who underwent living donor liver transplantation for chronic or acute liver failure were reviewed. The effect of the graft weight ratio (graft weight divided by standard liver weight of recipient) on graft function and survival was studied. Results. The graft weight ratio ranged from 31 to 203%. The overall graft and patient survival rates were 84% at a median follow-up of 29 months. The survival rate was 95% for recipients with a graft weight ratio >40%, and 40% only for those with a ratio ≤40% (P=0.016). It was 88% (7/8) when the ratio was >100%, 100% (5/5) when the ratio was 71 to 100%, 100% (7/7) when the ratio was 41 to 70%, and 40% (2/5) only when the ratio was ≤40%. When the graft weight ratio was ≤40%, early graft dysfunction was evident and contributed to the causes of death in three patients. Conclusions. Preoperative computed tomographic measurement of liver size of a living donor is essential. A graft that represented 40% or less of the recipient's standard liver weight should be regarded as a marginal graft with a lower success rate.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationTransplantation, 1999, v. 68 n. 8, p. 1112-1116 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199910270-00009
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199910270-00009
 
dc.identifier.epage1116
 
dc.identifier.hkuros47513
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000083496600009
 
dc.identifier.issn0041-1337
2012 Impact Factor: 3.781
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.521
 
dc.identifier.issue8
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid10551638
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033610493
 
dc.identifier.spage1112
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83670
 
dc.identifier.volume68
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofTransplantation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsTransplantation. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
 
dc.titleMinimum graft size for successful living donor liver transplantation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Fan, ST</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Liu, CL</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Lam, BK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lau, GK</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Wong, J</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Background. The extension of living donor liver transplantation to adult recipients is limited by the adequacy of the size of the graft. We evaluate the effect of the graft size on the survival of the recipient in order to establish a clinical guide for the minimum requirement. Methods. The clinical records of 14 adults and 11 children (body weight 6.1-100 kg) who underwent living donor liver transplantation for chronic or acute liver failure were reviewed. The effect of the graft weight ratio (graft weight divided by standard liver weight of recipient) on graft function and survival was studied. Results. The graft weight ratio ranged from 31 to 203%. The overall graft and patient survival rates were 84% at a median follow-up of 29 months. The survival rate was 95% for recipients with a graft weight ratio &gt;40%, and 40% only for those with a ratio &#8804;40% (P=0.016). It was 88% (7/8) when the ratio was &gt;100%, 100% (5/5) when the ratio was 71 to 100%, 100% (7/7) when the ratio was 41 to 70%, and 40% (2/5) only when the ratio was &#8804;40%. When the graft weight ratio was &#8804;40%, early graft dysfunction was evident and contributed to the causes of death in three patients. Conclusions. Preoperative computed tomographic measurement of liver size of a living donor is essential. A graft that represented 40% or less of the recipient&apos;s standard liver weight should be regarded as a marginal graft with a lower success rate.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong