File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Total pelvic exenteration for locally advanced rectal cancer

TitleTotal pelvic exenteration for locally advanced rectal cancer
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jamcollsurg
Citation
Journal Of The American College Of Surgeons, 2000, v. 190 n. 1, p. 78-83 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Since its first description in 1948, total pelvic exenteration has been a surgical option for the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer in selected patients. During these 50 years, it has remained a formidable procedure with high mortality and substantial morbidity. This report describes the results of total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer in terms of postoperative mortality, morbidity, and longterm survival in patients with locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer. Study Design: A study of the patient records revealed that 24 patients underwent total pelvic exenteration as the treatment for locally advanced primary or recurrent cancer of the rectum from 1983 to 1998. The charts of the patients were reviewed, and morbidity and mortality were documented. The survival of the patients was also analyzed. Results: Fifteen patients had primary tumor and 9 had locally recurrent cancer. The mean age was 62 years old. There were no postoperative deaths, and the complication rate was 54%. In the treatment of primary tumor, bowel continuity was possible in 60% of the patients. Previous radiation or operation for recurrent disease was not associated with increased morbidity. The overall 5-year survival was 44%. The 5-year survival of patients with primary cancer was 64% and was significantly better than the rate for those with recurrent disease. Only one patient with recurrent disease survived more than 24 months. Conclusions: Total pelvic exenteration now can be performed with low mortality rates, but the morbidity remains high. In the treatment of primary rectal cancer, good survival (64%) can be achieved, but results are dismal for the treatment of recurrent disease. We suggest better selection of patients for this procedure, especially as a treatment for recurrent rectal cancer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83632
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.257
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.604
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChu, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChoi, HKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:43:20Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:43:20Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American College Of Surgeons, 2000, v. 190 n. 1, p. 78-83en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1072-7515en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83632-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Since its first description in 1948, total pelvic exenteration has been a surgical option for the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer in selected patients. During these 50 years, it has remained a formidable procedure with high mortality and substantial morbidity. This report describes the results of total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer in terms of postoperative mortality, morbidity, and longterm survival in patients with locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer. Study Design: A study of the patient records revealed that 24 patients underwent total pelvic exenteration as the treatment for locally advanced primary or recurrent cancer of the rectum from 1983 to 1998. The charts of the patients were reviewed, and morbidity and mortality were documented. The survival of the patients was also analyzed. Results: Fifteen patients had primary tumor and 9 had locally recurrent cancer. The mean age was 62 years old. There were no postoperative deaths, and the complication rate was 54%. In the treatment of primary tumor, bowel continuity was possible in 60% of the patients. Previous radiation or operation for recurrent disease was not associated with increased morbidity. The overall 5-year survival was 44%. The 5-year survival of patients with primary cancer was 64% and was significantly better than the rate for those with recurrent disease. Only one patient with recurrent disease survived more than 24 months. Conclusions: Total pelvic exenteration now can be performed with low mortality rates, but the morbidity remains high. In the treatment of primary rectal cancer, good survival (64%) can be achieved, but results are dismal for the treatment of recurrent disease. We suggest better selection of patients for this procedure, especially as a treatment for recurrent rectal cancer.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jamcollsurgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American College of Surgeonsen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of American College of Surgeons. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.titleTotal pelvic exenteration for locally advanced rectal canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1072-7515&volume=190&spage=78&epage=83&date=2000&atitle=Total+pelvic+exenteration+for+locally+advanced+rectal+canceren_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, WL: lawwl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, WL=rp00436en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1072-7515(99)00229-Xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10625236-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0343114425en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros47718en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0343114425&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume190en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage78en_HK
dc.identifier.epage83en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000084452700006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, WL=7103147867en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, KW=7402453653en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, HK=7404339913en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats