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Conference Paper: Ethics and rationale of living-donor liver transplantation in Asia

TitleEthics and rationale of living-donor liver transplantation in Asia
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.com
Citation
Transplantation, 2003, v. 75 n. 3 SUPPL., p. S2-S5 How to Cite?
AbstractLiving-donor liver transplantation took root in Asia as a natural result of circumstances, because the supply of organs from the cadaveric pool remained scarce over the years. In contrast to Western countries, the majority of organs for liver transplantation in Asia come from live donations. As the expertise of the transplant teams grows, patient outcomes improve, and public awareness increases, the option of live donation of the liver is increasingly chosen. Although no live liver donor death has yet been reported from Asia, the risk is not eliminated and remains a major consideration in the potential donor's decision to donate. The low morbidity and mortality rate could be attributed to the extensive experience of surgeons in liver surgery, because surgical liver disease is highly prevalent in Asia. Although the donor risk is estimated to be low, live organ donation should be absolutely voluntary, with consent given on the basis of unbiased information and chosen only when the option for obtaining a cadaveric graft is practically nil. It is only under these conditions that living-donor liver transplantation should be perpetuated. Although the disease-donation-transplantation process involves a complex interplay of psychosocial and family dynamics, the potential candidate's perception will necessarily depend on the surgeon's explanation. The ethical soundness of the practice of living-donor liver transplantation rests primarily on the ones who deliver the service.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83613
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.69
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.699
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDe Villa, VHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, CLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:43:06Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:43:06Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTransplantation, 2003, v. 75 n. 3 SUPPL., p. S2-S5en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0041-1337en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83613-
dc.description.abstractLiving-donor liver transplantation took root in Asia as a natural result of circumstances, because the supply of organs from the cadaveric pool remained scarce over the years. In contrast to Western countries, the majority of organs for liver transplantation in Asia come from live donations. As the expertise of the transplant teams grows, patient outcomes improve, and public awareness increases, the option of live donation of the liver is increasingly chosen. Although no live liver donor death has yet been reported from Asia, the risk is not eliminated and remains a major consideration in the potential donor's decision to donate. The low morbidity and mortality rate could be attributed to the extensive experience of surgeons in liver surgery, because surgical liver disease is highly prevalent in Asia. Although the donor risk is estimated to be low, live organ donation should be absolutely voluntary, with consent given on the basis of unbiased information and chosen only when the option for obtaining a cadaveric graft is practically nil. It is only under these conditions that living-donor liver transplantation should be perpetuated. Although the disease-donation-transplantation process involves a complex interplay of psychosocial and family dynamics, the potential candidate's perception will necessarily depend on the surgeon's explanation. The ethical soundness of the practice of living-donor liver transplantation rests primarily on the ones who deliver the service.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTransplantationen_HK
dc.rightsTransplantation. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.titleEthics and rationale of living-donor liver transplantation in Asiaen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0041-1337&volume=75&spage=S2&epage=S5&date=2003&atitle=Ethics+and+rationale+of+living-donor+liver+transplantation+in+Asiaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, CM: chungmlo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, CM=rp00412en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid12589129-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037442179en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros77126en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037442179&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume75en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3 SUPPL.en_HK
dc.identifier.spageS2en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS5en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181167000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Villa, VH=7004295971en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, CM=7401771672en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, CL=25949456200en_HK

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