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Article: Current status of pharyngolaryngo-esophagectomy and pharyngogastric anastomosis

TitleCurrent status of pharyngolaryngo-esophagectomy and pharyngogastric anastomosis
Authors
KeywordsCervical esophagus
Gastric pull-up
Hypopharynx
Pharyngogastric anastomosis
Pharyngolaryngo-esophagectomy
Issue Date1998
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38137
Citation
Head And Neck, 1998, v. 20 n. 3, p. 240-244 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Pharyngolaryngo-esophagectomy and pharyngogastric anastomosis (PLO and PGA) is one of the surgical options in the management of tumors arising from the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus. Indications of the operation and the outcome are changing over the years. To examine these, the experience of this operation in one Institute (the Head and Neck Division of the Department of Surgery, The University of Hong Kong at Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong) over the last 30 years was reviewed. Methods. From 1966 to 1995, a total of 317 patients underwent PLO and PGA. The clinical results of 69 patients operated on between 1986 and 1995 were analyzed and compared with those of the two groups of patients reported previously from the same Institute to establish the current status of PLO and PGA. Results. The demographic data of three groups of patients were similar. In previous years, 53% of the primary tumors were advanced laryngeal carcinomas extending to the hypopharynx, whereas the other 47% originated from hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal regions. In recent years, all patients belonged to the latter group. Conclusions. The hospital mortality has decreased from 31% to 9%, and the incidence of morbidity such as anastomotic leakage and bleeding has also been reduced, from 20% to 10%. This may be related to the introduction of transthoracic endoscopic mobilization of the esophagus and patient selection. The overall minor morbidity has, however, remained at about 49%, and the 5-year actuarial survival rate has improved, from 18% in the 1970s to 24.5% at present.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83558
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.76
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.233
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, LKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, PWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:42:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:42:28Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHead And Neck, 1998, v. 20 n. 3, p. 240-244en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1043-3074en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83558-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Pharyngolaryngo-esophagectomy and pharyngogastric anastomosis (PLO and PGA) is one of the surgical options in the management of tumors arising from the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus. Indications of the operation and the outcome are changing over the years. To examine these, the experience of this operation in one Institute (the Head and Neck Division of the Department of Surgery, The University of Hong Kong at Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong) over the last 30 years was reviewed. Methods. From 1966 to 1995, a total of 317 patients underwent PLO and PGA. The clinical results of 69 patients operated on between 1986 and 1995 were analyzed and compared with those of the two groups of patients reported previously from the same Institute to establish the current status of PLO and PGA. Results. The demographic data of three groups of patients were similar. In previous years, 53% of the primary tumors were advanced laryngeal carcinomas extending to the hypopharynx, whereas the other 47% originated from hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal regions. In recent years, all patients belonged to the latter group. Conclusions. The hospital mortality has decreased from 31% to 9%, and the incidence of morbidity such as anastomotic leakage and bleeding has also been reduced, from 20% to 10%. This may be related to the introduction of transthoracic endoscopic mobilization of the esophagus and patient selection. The overall minor morbidity has, however, remained at about 49%, and the 5-year actuarial survival rate has improved, from 18% in the 1970s to 24.5% at present.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38137en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHead and Necken_HK
dc.subjectCervical esophagusen_HK
dc.subjectGastric pull-upen_HK
dc.subjectHypopharynxen_HK
dc.subjectPharyngogastric anastomosisen_HK
dc.subjectPharyngolaryngo-esophagectomyen_HK
dc.titleCurrent status of pharyngolaryngo-esophagectomy and pharyngogastric anastomosisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0017-8748&volume=20&spage=240&epage=244&date=1998&atitle=Current+status+of+pharyngolaryngo-esophagectomy+and+pharyngogastric+anastomosisen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, J: jwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, J=rp00322en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1097-0347(199805)20:3<240::AID-HED9>3.0.CO;2-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9570630-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2642620241en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros31646en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2642620241&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage240en_HK
dc.identifier.epage244en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000073097500009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, LK=7201984637en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, PW=7103124007en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=8049324500en_HK

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