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Article: Risk factors for inguinal hernia in adult males: A case-control study

TitleRisk factors for inguinal hernia in adult males: A case-control study
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surg
Citation
Surgery, 2007, v. 141 n. 2, p. 262-266 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Inguinal hernia is one of the most common surgical pathologies. Research studies on clinical factors predisposing a person for the development of inguinal hernia, however, remain scarce. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the risk factors for the development of inguinal hernia in adult males, using a case-control design in a hospital-based population. Methods: Between January 2002 and January 2004, a total of 1,418 male patients were recruited at the general surgical or hernia clinic of a University-affiliated teaching hospital. Patients were divided into case and control groups according to the presence of a primary inguinal hernia. Each patient was interviewed by a research assistant using a standardized questionnaire. Clinical data were studied by multivariate, logistic regression analyses to identify independent predictors of inguinal hernia in adult males. Results: Clinical factors associated with the presence of inguinal hernia included a higher work activity index (P = 0.03), a higher total activity index (P = 0.01), a positive family history of inguinal hernia (P < 0.01, odds ratio = 8.73), and chronic obstructive airway disease (P = 0.04, odds ratio = 2.04). After adjustments for the type of hernia, chronic obstructive airway disease was a risk factor only for direct hernia, whereas total activity index and family history of hernia remained significantly related to both direct and indirect hernias. On logistic regression analyses, positive family history of hernia was the only independent predictor for inguinal hernia. Conclusions: Family history of hernia was the most important determinant factor for developing inguinal hernia in adult males. A male subject who has a positive family history of hernia is 8 times more likely to develop a primary inguinal hernia. © 2007 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83522
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.620
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFang, CXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPatil, NGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:42:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:42:02Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgery, 2007, v. 141 n. 2, p. 262-266en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0039-6060en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83522-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Inguinal hernia is one of the most common surgical pathologies. Research studies on clinical factors predisposing a person for the development of inguinal hernia, however, remain scarce. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the risk factors for the development of inguinal hernia in adult males, using a case-control design in a hospital-based population. Methods: Between January 2002 and January 2004, a total of 1,418 male patients were recruited at the general surgical or hernia clinic of a University-affiliated teaching hospital. Patients were divided into case and control groups according to the presence of a primary inguinal hernia. Each patient was interviewed by a research assistant using a standardized questionnaire. Clinical data were studied by multivariate, logistic regression analyses to identify independent predictors of inguinal hernia in adult males. Results: Clinical factors associated with the presence of inguinal hernia included a higher work activity index (P = 0.03), a higher total activity index (P = 0.01), a positive family history of inguinal hernia (P < 0.01, odds ratio = 8.73), and chronic obstructive airway disease (P = 0.04, odds ratio = 2.04). After adjustments for the type of hernia, chronic obstructive airway disease was a risk factor only for direct hernia, whereas total activity index and family history of hernia remained significantly related to both direct and indirect hernias. On logistic regression analyses, positive family history of hernia was the only independent predictor for inguinal hernia. Conclusions: Family history of hernia was the most important determinant factor for developing inguinal hernia in adult males. A male subject who has a positive family history of hernia is 8 times more likely to develop a primary inguinal hernia. © 2007 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgeryen_HK
dc.titleRisk factors for inguinal hernia in adult males: A case-control studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0263-9319&volume=141&issue=2&spage=262&epage=266&date=2007&atitle=Risk+factors+for+inguinal+hernia+in+adult+males:+a+case-control+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPatil, NG: ngpatil@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPatil, NG=rp00388en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.surg.2006.04.014en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17263984-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846460015en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros127742en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846460015&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume141en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage262en_HK
dc.identifier.epage266en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244104400024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, H=7201497812en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, C=15122128100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, WK=7102761292en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPatil, NG=7103152514en_HK

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