File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Epidemiology of atherosclerotic peripheral arterial occlusive disease in Hong Kong

TitleEpidemiology of atherosclerotic peripheral arterial occlusive disease in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00268/
Citation
World Journal Of Surgery, 1999, v. 23 n. 2, p. 202-206 How to Cite?
AbstractThe epidemiology of atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has rarely been studied in Asia. A prospective vascular registry consisting of 510 Chinese patients with PAD from a teaching hospital in Hong Kong disclosed a male/female ratio of 1.6:1.0 with a mean age of 72 years. The predominant pattern was femoropopliteal occlusive disease (49%). Half of all patients had tissue loss on presentation, more so in women (67%) than men (38%). Demographic and biochemical risk factors examined showed many similarities with the West, included smoking (59%), hypertension (55%), diabetes mellitus (42%), hypercholesterolemia (55%), elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) (60%), triglycerides (31%), hyperfibrinogenemia (62%), and hyperglycemia (49%). Chinese female patients with PAD were older and had a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus (54%). Smoking is less a problem in women (28%). They suffered predominantly from femoropopliteal and distal vessel disease, and two-thirds presented with tissue loss. Female patients also have significantly higher levels of fasting glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Male patients were mostly smokers (80%) with a higher proportion of aortoiliac disease. Critical ischemia in the form of tissue loss was associated with female sex (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), nonsmoking (p < 0.001), diabetes (p < 0.005), a low hemoglobin/hematocrit (p < 0.001), a high white blood cell count (p < 0.001), and high levels of fibrinogen (p < 0.01) and cholesterol (p < 0.05). An increasing incidence of PAD was noted in Hong Kong. Most of the patients present late with advanced ischemia. It is possible that this disease pattern represents only a fraction of the true incidence of PAD in the territory.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83459
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.523
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.375
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, SWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTing, ACWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:41:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:41:17Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal Of Surgery, 1999, v. 23 n. 2, p. 202-206en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83459-
dc.description.abstractThe epidemiology of atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has rarely been studied in Asia. A prospective vascular registry consisting of 510 Chinese patients with PAD from a teaching hospital in Hong Kong disclosed a male/female ratio of 1.6:1.0 with a mean age of 72 years. The predominant pattern was femoropopliteal occlusive disease (49%). Half of all patients had tissue loss on presentation, more so in women (67%) than men (38%). Demographic and biochemical risk factors examined showed many similarities with the West, included smoking (59%), hypertension (55%), diabetes mellitus (42%), hypercholesterolemia (55%), elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) (60%), triglycerides (31%), hyperfibrinogenemia (62%), and hyperglycemia (49%). Chinese female patients with PAD were older and had a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus (54%). Smoking is less a problem in women (28%). They suffered predominantly from femoropopliteal and distal vessel disease, and two-thirds presented with tissue loss. Female patients also have significantly higher levels of fasting glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Male patients were mostly smokers (80%) with a higher proportion of aortoiliac disease. Critical ischemia in the form of tissue loss was associated with female sex (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), nonsmoking (p < 0.001), diabetes (p < 0.005), a low hemoglobin/hematocrit (p < 0.001), a high white blood cell count (p < 0.001), and high levels of fibrinogen (p < 0.01) and cholesterol (p < 0.05). An increasing incidence of PAD was noted in Hong Kong. Most of the patients present late with advanced ischemia. It is possible that this disease pattern represents only a fraction of the true incidence of PAD in the territory.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00268/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Surgeryen_HK
dc.titleEpidemiology of atherosclerotic peripheral arterial occlusive disease in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0364-2313&volume=23&spage=202&epage=206&date=1999&atitle=Epidemiology+of+atherosclerotic+peripheral+arterial+occlusive+disease+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheng, SWK: wkcheng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, J: jwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, SWK=rp00374en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, J=rp00322en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/PL00013161en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9880433-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032908102en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros39516en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032908102&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage202en_HK
dc.identifier.epage206en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000078060100017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, SWK=7404684779en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTing, ACW=7102858552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, H=7201497812en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=8049324500en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats