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Article: First two cases of living related liver transplantation with complicated anatomy of blood vessels in Beijing

TitleFirst two cases of living related liver transplantation with complicated anatomy of blood vessels in Beijing
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherBaishideng Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/index.htm
Citation
World Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2004, v. 10 n. 19, p. 2854-2858 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: Living related liver transplantation (LRLT) has been developed in response to the paediatric organ donor shortage. Though it has been succeeded in many centers worldwide, the safety of the donor is still a major concern, especially in donors with anatomy variation. We succeeded in performing the first two cases of living related liver transplantation with complicated anatomy of blood vessels as a way to overcome cadaveric organ shortage in Beijing. Methods: Two patients, with congenital liver fibrosis and congenital biliary atresia were performed with living donor liver transplantation in our hospital and then followed up from November 12 to December 13, 2001. The two living donors, mother and father, were healthy aged 34 and 35 years. One right lobe (segment V, VI, VII, VIII) and one left lateral lobe (segment II and III) were used. The grafts weighed 394 g and 300 g. The ratio of graff weight to the standard liver volume (SLV) of donors was 68% and 27%. The graft weight to recipient body weight ratio was 3.2% and 4.4%. The graft weight to recipient estimated standard liver mass (ESLM) ratio was 63% and 85%. The two donors had complicated blood vessel variation. Results: Two patients undergone living donor liver transplantation had good results. Abnormal liver function with high bilirubin level appeared in a few days after operation, bur liver function returned to normal one month after operation with bilirubin level almost decreased to near normal. No bleeding, thrombosis, infection and bile leakage occurred. One had an acure rejection and recovered. The two donors recovered in two weeks. One had slight fever because of a little collection in abdomen and recovered after paracentesis and drainage. Conclusion: Living donor liver transplantation has been proved to be a good way that offers a unique opportunity of getting a timely liver graft as a response to shortage of pediatric donors, though it could be a technically difficult operation if there is anatomical variation. Copyright © 2004 by The WJG Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83437
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.369
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.785
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, WHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWan, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, YMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, YTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, STen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:41:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:41:02Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2004, v. 10 n. 19, p. 2854-2858en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1007-9327en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83437-
dc.description.abstractAim: Living related liver transplantation (LRLT) has been developed in response to the paediatric organ donor shortage. Though it has been succeeded in many centers worldwide, the safety of the donor is still a major concern, especially in donors with anatomy variation. We succeeded in performing the first two cases of living related liver transplantation with complicated anatomy of blood vessels as a way to overcome cadaveric organ shortage in Beijing. Methods: Two patients, with congenital liver fibrosis and congenital biliary atresia were performed with living donor liver transplantation in our hospital and then followed up from November 12 to December 13, 2001. The two living donors, mother and father, were healthy aged 34 and 35 years. One right lobe (segment V, VI, VII, VIII) and one left lateral lobe (segment II and III) were used. The grafts weighed 394 g and 300 g. The ratio of graff weight to the standard liver volume (SLV) of donors was 68% and 27%. The graft weight to recipient body weight ratio was 3.2% and 4.4%. The graft weight to recipient estimated standard liver mass (ESLM) ratio was 63% and 85%. The two donors had complicated blood vessel variation. Results: Two patients undergone living donor liver transplantation had good results. Abnormal liver function with high bilirubin level appeared in a few days after operation, bur liver function returned to normal one month after operation with bilirubin level almost decreased to near normal. No bleeding, thrombosis, infection and bile leakage occurred. One had an acure rejection and recovered. The two donors recovered in two weeks. One had slight fever because of a little collection in abdomen and recovered after paracentesis and drainage. Conclusion: Living donor liver transplantation has been proved to be a good way that offers a unique opportunity of getting a timely liver graft as a response to shortage of pediatric donors, though it could be a technically difficult operation if there is anatomical variation. Copyright © 2004 by The WJG Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBaishideng Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Gastroenterologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleFirst two cases of living related liver transplantation with complicated anatomy of blood vessels in Beijingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1007-9327&volume=10&issue=19&spage=2854&epage=2858&date=2004&atitle=First+two+cases+of+living+related+liver+transplantation+with+complicated+anatomy+of+blood+vessels+in+Beijingen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFan, ST: stfan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFan, ST=rp00355en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3748/wjg.v10.i19.2854-
dc.identifier.pmid15334685-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4572117-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4644364553en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros96811en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4644364553&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue19en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2854en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2858en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208097300019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, WH=7407077602en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, YL=7402417337en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, L=7404389438en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, YM=8355272900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, YT=7501575168en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, CL=25949456200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, ST=7402678224en_HK

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