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Article: Laparoscopic surgery for common surgical emergencies: A population-based study

TitleLaparoscopic surgery for common surgical emergencies: A population-based study
Authors
KeywordsAppendectomy
Cholecystectomy
Emergency
Laparoscopic surgery
Perforated peptic ulcer
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2005, v. 19 n. 6, p. 774-779 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Despite being controversial in the past, many reports on the safe use of laparoscopic surgery in emergency settings have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the diffusion of laparoscopic surgery in three common surgical emergency operations, namely, appendectomy, cholecystectomy, and simple repair of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU), in a stable population. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of the central database of the Hospital Authority (HA) in Hong Kong. Data for patients managed in 14 HA hospitals from 1998 to 2002 were studied. The operation record and discharge record of each patient were also investigated to verify the data. Results: A total of 12,708 patients underwent appendectomy, 2631 patients underwent cholecystectomy, and 2260 patients had simple repair of PPU performed. During the study period, 37.2% of appendectomies, 46.5% of cholecystectomies, and 23.1% of simple repairs of PPU were performed laparoscopically. More than a two-fold increase in the proportion of laparoscopic surgery was observed in each of these three operations. By the end of 2002, the percentage of laparoscopic surgery had increased to 53.5% for appendectomies, 61.3% for cholecystectomies, and 32.9% for simple repairs of PPU. Significantly lower hospital mortality rates and shorter postoperative hospital stay were consistenty observed in patients with laparoscopic surgery of the three emergencies. A wide variation in the use of laparoscopic surgery, ranging from 3.7% to 73.1%, was observed among the 14 HA hospitals. However, there was no correlation in the use of laparoscopic surgery with the volume of operation performed in each hospital (p = 0.933). Conclusion: A high diffusion rate on the use of laparoscopic surgery for common surgical emergency was observed in Hong Kong. However, there was also a wide variation in the diffusion rate among the 14 HA hospitals. Efforts to reduce hospital variation for the better dissemination of safe laparoscopic technique may be warranted. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83264
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, AWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChik, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorWai, ACen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, STen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:38:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:38:57Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2005, v. 19 n. 6, p. 774-779en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83264-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Despite being controversial in the past, many reports on the safe use of laparoscopic surgery in emergency settings have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the diffusion of laparoscopic surgery in three common surgical emergency operations, namely, appendectomy, cholecystectomy, and simple repair of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU), in a stable population. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of the central database of the Hospital Authority (HA) in Hong Kong. Data for patients managed in 14 HA hospitals from 1998 to 2002 were studied. The operation record and discharge record of each patient were also investigated to verify the data. Results: A total of 12,708 patients underwent appendectomy, 2631 patients underwent cholecystectomy, and 2260 patients had simple repair of PPU performed. During the study period, 37.2% of appendectomies, 46.5% of cholecystectomies, and 23.1% of simple repairs of PPU were performed laparoscopically. More than a two-fold increase in the proportion of laparoscopic surgery was observed in each of these three operations. By the end of 2002, the percentage of laparoscopic surgery had increased to 53.5% for appendectomies, 61.3% for cholecystectomies, and 32.9% for simple repairs of PPU. Significantly lower hospital mortality rates and shorter postoperative hospital stay were consistenty observed in patients with laparoscopic surgery of the three emergencies. A wide variation in the use of laparoscopic surgery, ranging from 3.7% to 73.1%, was observed among the 14 HA hospitals. However, there was no correlation in the use of laparoscopic surgery with the volume of operation performed in each hospital (p = 0.933). Conclusion: A high diffusion rate on the use of laparoscopic surgery for common surgical emergency was observed in Hong Kong. However, there was also a wide variation in the diffusion rate among the 14 HA hospitals. Efforts to reduce hospital variation for the better dissemination of safe laparoscopic technique may be warranted. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniquesen_HK
dc.subjectAppendectomyen_HK
dc.subjectCholecystectomyen_HK
dc.subjectEmergencyen_HK
dc.subjectLaparoscopic surgeryen_HK
dc.subjectPerforated peptic ulceren_HK
dc.titleLaparoscopic surgery for common surgical emergencies: A population-based studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0930-2794&volume=19&issue=6&spage=774&epage=779&date=2005&atitle=Laparoscopic+surgery+for+common+surgical+emergencies:+a+population-based+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFan, ST: stfan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFan, ST=rp00355en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-004-9158-5en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15868254-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-24044529476en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros116912en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-24044529476&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage774en_HK
dc.identifier.epage779en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231378500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CM=7402989820en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, AW=9338151700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChik, B=15764573900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWai, AC=26022225500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, ST=7402678224en_HK

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