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Article: Assessment of the future resources and needs for hospitalization in Hong Kong SAR

TitleAssessment of the future resources and needs for hospitalization in Hong Kong SAR
Authors
Keywords'Compressed morbidity'
Ageing
Hong Kong
Hospitalization
Needs
Resources
SAR
Issue Date2002
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4005
Citation
International Journal Of Health Planning And Management, 2002, v. 17 n. 2, p. 113-122 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To study the 'compression of morbidity' theory in the Hong Kong SAR by analysing the age and gender-specific hospitalization rates and the expected length of stay per patient for the period 1996-2000. 'Compression of morbidity' refers to the hypothesis that medical progress will reduce the duration of morbidity during life more significantly than increasing morbidity by extending life. Design: This is a retrospective study based on hospital admissions data from the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong which covers 93% of the patient population. Setting: Age and gender-specific hospitalization rates, expected length of stay and hospitalization needs for each specific age group in Hong Kong from 1996 to 2000, are estimated. Main results: There is no empirical support for compression theory; and there is no significant change in the hospital admission rates for the period 1996-2000. The total number of patient days is expected to increase by 80% because of the ageing effect alone. It is projected that the geriatric service will account for more than 60% of the hospital patient days utilization in 2029. The elderly dependency ratio will increase and the social burden for the next generation will be increased, as the working populations size continues to decrease due to low fertility in the Hong Kong SAR. Conclusion: The health care burden on the government is large and increasing. It is therefore essential to make plans to deal with the ageing population, which is predicted to be at its highest in 2020. The rising effect of public expectations on hospital services exerts further pressure on demand. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83042
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.11
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.554
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:36:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:36:16Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Health Planning And Management, 2002, v. 17 n. 2, p. 113-122en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0749-6753en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83042-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To study the 'compression of morbidity' theory in the Hong Kong SAR by analysing the age and gender-specific hospitalization rates and the expected length of stay per patient for the period 1996-2000. 'Compression of morbidity' refers to the hypothesis that medical progress will reduce the duration of morbidity during life more significantly than increasing morbidity by extending life. Design: This is a retrospective study based on hospital admissions data from the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong which covers 93% of the patient population. Setting: Age and gender-specific hospitalization rates, expected length of stay and hospitalization needs for each specific age group in Hong Kong from 1996 to 2000, are estimated. Main results: There is no empirical support for compression theory; and there is no significant change in the hospital admission rates for the period 1996-2000. The total number of patient days is expected to increase by 80% because of the ageing effect alone. It is projected that the geriatric service will account for more than 60% of the hospital patient days utilization in 2029. The elderly dependency ratio will increase and the social burden for the next generation will be increased, as the working populations size continues to decrease due to low fertility in the Hong Kong SAR. Conclusion: The health care burden on the government is large and increasing. It is therefore essential to make plans to deal with the ageing population, which is predicted to be at its highest in 2020. The rising effect of public expectations on hospital services exerts further pressure on demand. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4005en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Health Planning and Managementen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Health Planning and Management. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject'Compressed morbidity'en_HK
dc.subjectAgeingen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectHospitalizationen_HK
dc.subjectNeedsen_HK
dc.subjectResourcesen_HK
dc.subjectSARen_HK
dc.titleAssessment of the future resources and needs for hospitalization in Hong Kong SARen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0749-6753&volume=17&spage=113&epage=122&date=2002&atitle=Assessment+of+the+future+resources+and+needs+for+hospitalization+in+Hong+Kong+SARen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hpm.662en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12126208-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036296812en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros68225en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036296812&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage113en_HK
dc.identifier.epage122en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000176543300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, CK=7201607366en_HK

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