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Article: Capture-recapture and multiple-record systems estimation I: History and theoretical development

TitleCapture-recapture and multiple-record systems estimation I: History and theoretical development
Authors
Keywordscontingency tables
interaction
log-linear models
Issue Date1995
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Epidemiology, 1995, v. 142 n. 10, p. 1047-1058 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper reviews the historical background and the theoretical development of models for the analysis of data from capture-recapture or multiple-record systems for estimating the size of closed populations. The models and methods were originally developed for use in fisheries and wildlife biology and were later adapted for use in connection with human populations. Application to epidemiology came much later. The simplest capture-recapture model involves two lists or samples and has four key assumptions; that the population is closed, that individuals can be matched from capture to recapture, that capture in the second sample is independent of capture in the first sample, and that the capture probabilities are homogeneous across all individuals in the population. Log-linear models provide a convenient representation for this basic capture-recapture model and its extensions to K lists. The paper provides an overview for these models and illustrates how they allow for dependency among the lists and heterogeneity in the population. The use of log-linear models for estimation in the presence of both dependence and heterogeneity is illustrated on a four-list example involving ascertainment of diabetes using data gathered in 1988 from residents of Casale Monferrato, Italy. The final section of the paper discusses techniques for model selection in the context of models for estimating the size of populations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82976
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.036
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBruno, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTajima, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSeber, GAFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBuckland, STen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCormack, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorUnwin, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, YFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFienberg, SEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJunker, BWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaPorte, REen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLibman, IMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcCarty, DJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:35:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:35:32Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Epidemiology, 1995, v. 142 n. 10, p. 1047-1058en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82976-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reviews the historical background and the theoretical development of models for the analysis of data from capture-recapture or multiple-record systems for estimating the size of closed populations. The models and methods were originally developed for use in fisheries and wildlife biology and were later adapted for use in connection with human populations. Application to epidemiology came much later. The simplest capture-recapture model involves two lists or samples and has four key assumptions; that the population is closed, that individuals can be matched from capture to recapture, that capture in the second sample is independent of capture in the first sample, and that the capture probabilities are homogeneous across all individuals in the population. Log-linear models provide a convenient representation for this basic capture-recapture model and its extensions to K lists. The paper provides an overview for these models and illustrates how they allow for dependency among the lists and heterogeneity in the population. The use of log-linear models for estimation in the presence of both dependence and heterogeneity is illustrated on a four-list example involving ascertainment of diabetes using data gathered in 1988 from residents of Casale Monferrato, Italy. The final section of the paper discusses techniques for model selection in the context of models for estimating the size of populations.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Epidemiology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectcontingency tablesen_HK
dc.subjectinteractionen_HK
dc.subjectlog-linear modelsen_HK
dc.titleCapture-recapture and multiple-record systems estimation I: History and theoretical developmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0002-9262&volume=142&spage=1047&epage=1058&date=1995&atitle=Capture-recapture+and+multiple-record+systems+estimation+I:+history+and+theoretical+developmenten_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid7485050-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028826064en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros8673en_HK
dc.identifier.volume142en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1047en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1058en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBruno, G=7202705380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTajima, N=7102220992en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSeber, GAF=6701480774en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBuckland, ST=7006852414en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCormack, RM=7005561300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridUnwin, N=7005647984en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, YF=7501840512en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFienberg, SE=7004411535en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJunker, BW=7006192398en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaPorte, RE=8933186600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLibman, IM=7003670101en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcCarty, DJ=35468270500en_HK

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