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Article: 10% or 5% match window in DNA profiling
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Title10% or 5% match window in DNA profiling
 
AuthorsFung, WK1
 
KeywordsBin size
DNA profiling
Fixed bins
Match window size
Match-binning
 
Issue Date1996
 
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forsciint
 
CitationForensic Science International, 1996, v. 78 n. 2, p. 111-118 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0379-0738(95)01876-X
 
AbstractThough the FBI repeatedly claims that the width of the window of the matching criterion they use in DNA profiling is 5%, it is shown that the width is indeed 10%. This fact has been noticed by some people but seems unknown to many. However, no one seems to be aware of the fundamental problem it creates to the fixed bin method employed by the FBI and some other laboratories because about half of the bins have sizes less than 10%. In other words, the probability for a random match of the DNA fragments from the crime scene and from the suspect could be underestimated. The problem may have serious implications for commonly adopted legal and forensic practices. The potential seriousness of underestimating the match probability is illustrated using the Hong Kong Chinese database.
 
ISSN0379-0738
2012 Impact Factor: 2.307
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.093
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0379-0738(95)01876-X
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:A1996UJ02400004
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorFung, WK
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:34:11Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:34:11Z
 
dc.date.issued1996
 
dc.description.abstractThough the FBI repeatedly claims that the width of the window of the matching criterion they use in DNA profiling is 5%, it is shown that the width is indeed 10%. This fact has been noticed by some people but seems unknown to many. However, no one seems to be aware of the fundamental problem it creates to the fixed bin method employed by the FBI and some other laboratories because about half of the bins have sizes less than 10%. In other words, the probability for a random match of the DNA fragments from the crime scene and from the suspect could be underestimated. The problem may have serious implications for commonly adopted legal and forensic practices. The potential seriousness of underestimating the match probability is illustrated using the Hong Kong Chinese database.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationForensic Science International, 1996, v. 78 n. 2, p. 111-118 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0379-0738(95)01876-X
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0379-0738(95)01876-X
 
dc.identifier.epage118
 
dc.identifier.hkuros11584
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996UJ02400004
 
dc.identifier.issn0379-0738
2012 Impact Factor: 2.307
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.093
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029917516
 
dc.identifier.spage111
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82855
 
dc.identifier.volume78
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forsciint
 
dc.publisher.placeIreland
 
dc.relation.ispartofForensic Science International
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsForensic Science International. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
 
dc.subjectBin size
 
dc.subjectDNA profiling
 
dc.subjectFixed bins
 
dc.subjectMatch window size
 
dc.subjectMatch-binning
 
dc.title10% or 5% match window in DNA profiling
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong