File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Nasalance measures in cantonese-speaking women

TitleNasalance measures in cantonese-speaking women
Authors
KeywordsCantonese
Chinese
Nasalance
Nasometer
Reliability
Resonance
Issue Date2001
PublisherAllen Press Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://cpcj.allenpress.com
Citation
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, 2001, v. 38 n. 2, p. 119-125 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To establish and evaluate stimulus materials for nasalance measurement in Cantonese speakers, to provide normative data for Cantonese speaking women, and to evaluate session-to-session reliability of nasalance measures. Participants and setting: One hundred forty-one Cantonese-speaking women with normal resonance who were students in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Hong Kong. Procedures: Participants read aloud four speech stimuli: oral sentences, nasal sentences, an oral paragraph (similar to the Zoo Passage), and an oralnasal paragraph (similar to the Rainbow Passage). Data were collected and analyzed using the Kay Nasometer 6200. Data collection was repeated for a subgroup of speakers (n = 28) on a separate day. Nasalance materials were evaluated by using statistical tests of difference and correlation. Results: Group mean (standard deviation) nasalance scores for oral sentences, nasal sentences, oral paragraph, and oral-nasal paragraph were 16.79 (5.99), 55.67 (7.38), 13.68 (7.16), and 35.46 (6.22), respectively. There was a significant difference in mean nasalance scores for oral versus nasal materials. Correlations between stimuli were as expected, ranging from 0.43 to 0.91. Session-to-session reliability was within 5 points for over 95% of speakers for the oral stimuli but for less than 76% of speakers for the nasal and oral-nasal stimuli. Conclusions: Standard nasalance materials have been developed for Cantonese, and normative data have been established for Cantonese women. Evaluation of materials indicated acceptable differentiation between oral and nasal materials. Two stimuli (nasal sentences and oral paragraph) are recommended for future use. Comparison with findings from other languages showed similarities in scores; possible language-specific differences are discussed. Session-to-session reliability was poorer for nasal than oral stimuli.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82630
ISSN
2010 Impact Factor: 0.77
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.685
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWhitehill, TLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:31:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:31:32Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, 2001, v. 38 n. 2, p. 119-125en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1055-6656en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82630-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To establish and evaluate stimulus materials for nasalance measurement in Cantonese speakers, to provide normative data for Cantonese speaking women, and to evaluate session-to-session reliability of nasalance measures. Participants and setting: One hundred forty-one Cantonese-speaking women with normal resonance who were students in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Hong Kong. Procedures: Participants read aloud four speech stimuli: oral sentences, nasal sentences, an oral paragraph (similar to the Zoo Passage), and an oralnasal paragraph (similar to the Rainbow Passage). Data were collected and analyzed using the Kay Nasometer 6200. Data collection was repeated for a subgroup of speakers (n = 28) on a separate day. Nasalance materials were evaluated by using statistical tests of difference and correlation. Results: Group mean (standard deviation) nasalance scores for oral sentences, nasal sentences, oral paragraph, and oral-nasal paragraph were 16.79 (5.99), 55.67 (7.38), 13.68 (7.16), and 35.46 (6.22), respectively. There was a significant difference in mean nasalance scores for oral versus nasal materials. Correlations between stimuli were as expected, ranging from 0.43 to 0.91. Session-to-session reliability was within 5 points for over 95% of speakers for the oral stimuli but for less than 76% of speakers for the nasal and oral-nasal stimuli. Conclusions: Standard nasalance materials have been developed for Cantonese, and normative data have been established for Cantonese women. Evaluation of materials indicated acceptable differentiation between oral and nasal materials. Two stimuli (nasal sentences and oral paragraph) are recommended for future use. Comparison with findings from other languages showed similarities in scores; possible language-specific differences are discussed. Session-to-session reliability was poorer for nasal than oral stimuli.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAllen Press Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://cpcj.allenpress.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journalen_HK
dc.subjectCantoneseen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectNasalanceen_HK
dc.subjectNasometeren_HK
dc.subjectReliabilityen_HK
dc.subjectResonanceen_HK
dc.titleNasalance measures in cantonese-speaking womenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1055-6656&volume=38&spage=119&epage=125&date=2001&atitle=Nasalance+measures+in+Cantonese-speaking+women.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailWhitehill, TL: tara@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWhitehill, TL=rp00970en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1597/1545-1569(2001)038<0119:NMICSW>2.0.CO;2en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11294539-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035003068en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros58285en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035003068&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage119en_HK
dc.identifier.epage125en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167420600004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhitehill, TL=7004098633en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats