File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Sentence comprehension in Cantonese Chinese aphasic patients

TitleSentence comprehension in Cantonese Chinese aphasic patients
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.asp
Citation
Aphasiology, 1998, v. 12 n. 1, p. 49-63 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper begins with a brief review of major theoretical accounts of English aphasic sentence comprehension, including the mapping hypothesis (Linebarger et al. 1983), the interpretive strategy proposed in Caplan (1985), and the trace-deletion hypothesis in Grodzinsky (1990). We then discuss some of the syntactic differences between Chinese and English with particular reference to the relativized and passive constructions, and formal linguistic analyses of these structures. In light of these syntactic differences a study was conducted investigating the ability of four Cantonese Chinese aphasic patients to comprehend auditorally and visually presented sentences. The results showed a dissociation between full and truncated passives in two patients, and a tendency suggesting that subject-relative sentences were more difficult to interpret than subject object-relatives. On the basis of their performance patterns we hypothesize about the nature of impairment of each patient by making reference to the three dominant accounts. These hypotheses then lead to a discussion of the relationship between neurolinguistic data and patient rehabilitation. More specifically, the former may provide useful information to speech therapists in designing individualized assessments and treatment programmes for patients, and evaluations of the effects of such interventions may in turn be shown to be of great value to theoretical advancement.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82592
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.139
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.730
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:31:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:31:07Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAphasiology, 1998, v. 12 n. 1, p. 49-63en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0268-7038en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82592-
dc.description.abstractThis paper begins with a brief review of major theoretical accounts of English aphasic sentence comprehension, including the mapping hypothesis (Linebarger et al. 1983), the interpretive strategy proposed in Caplan (1985), and the trace-deletion hypothesis in Grodzinsky (1990). We then discuss some of the syntactic differences between Chinese and English with particular reference to the relativized and passive constructions, and formal linguistic analyses of these structures. In light of these syntactic differences a study was conducted investigating the ability of four Cantonese Chinese aphasic patients to comprehend auditorally and visually presented sentences. The results showed a dissociation between full and truncated passives in two patients, and a tendency suggesting that subject-relative sentences were more difficult to interpret than subject object-relatives. On the basis of their performance patterns we hypothesize about the nature of impairment of each patient by making reference to the three dominant accounts. These hypotheses then lead to a discussion of the relationship between neurolinguistic data and patient rehabilitation. More specifically, the former may provide useful information to speech therapists in designing individualized assessments and treatment programmes for patients, and evaluations of the effects of such interventions may in turn be shown to be of great value to theoretical advancement.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAphasiologyen_HK
dc.rightsAphasiology. Copyright © Psychology Press.en_HK
dc.titleSentence comprehension in Cantonese Chinese aphasic patientsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0268-7038&volume=12&issue=1&spage=49&epage=64&date=1998&atitle=Sentence+Comprehension+in+Cantonese+Chinese+Aphasic+Patientsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SP: splaw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, MT: mtleung@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SP=rp00920en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, MT=rp00925en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031964805en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros36397en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031964805&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage49en_HK
dc.identifier.epage63en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, SP=7202242088en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, MT=7201943346en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats