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Article: Nasalance distance and ratio: Two new measures

TitleNasalance distance and ratio: Two new measures
Authors
KeywordsCleft lip and palate
Hypernasality
Hyperrhinophonia
Instrumental analysis speech
Nasalance
NasalView
Nasometer
Issue Date2000
PublisherAllen Press Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://cpcj.allenpress.com
Citation
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, 2000, v. 37 n. 3, p. 248-256 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Mean nasalance in speakers with perceptually normal nasal resonance can differ in magnitude considerably. In addition, categorizations of speech based on nasalance scores may not agree with perceptual judgments. To overcome this limitation, we evaluated two new simple measures derived from mean nasalance data: the nasalance distance (range between maximum and minimum nasalance) and the nasalance ratio (minimum nasalance divided by maximum nasalance). Setting: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Technology, Munich, Germany. Subjects: The sample consisted of 133 cleft lip and palate patients with normal nasal resonance or varying degrees of hypernasality. Procedures: Oral and nasal acoustic measurements were made using the NasalView system. Nasalance distance and nasalance ratio were calculated for five nonnasal and three nasal sentences from the modified Heidelberg Rhinophonia Assessment Form. Results: Optimum cutoffs were derived from Receiver-Operating Characteristics. Results for the sentence stimuli ranged from 64.4% to 89.6% sensitivity and from 91.2% to 94.1% specificity. When the analysis was limited to only one nonnasal and one nasal sentence, results ranged from 79.7% to 87.5% sensitivity and from 88.2% to 97.1% specificity. Conclusions: We conclude that the two new measurements are valuable in routine clinical examinations. Nasalance distance and ratio derived from sentence stimuli are two useful and easily applicable measures that can be used to supplement the nasalance mean value.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82565
ISSN
2010 Impact Factor: 0.77
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.685
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBressmann, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorSader, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorWhitehill, TLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAwan, SNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZeilhofer, HFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHorch, HHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:30:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:30:48Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, 2000, v. 37 n. 3, p. 248-256en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1055-6656en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82565-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Mean nasalance in speakers with perceptually normal nasal resonance can differ in magnitude considerably. In addition, categorizations of speech based on nasalance scores may not agree with perceptual judgments. To overcome this limitation, we evaluated two new simple measures derived from mean nasalance data: the nasalance distance (range between maximum and minimum nasalance) and the nasalance ratio (minimum nasalance divided by maximum nasalance). Setting: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Technology, Munich, Germany. Subjects: The sample consisted of 133 cleft lip and palate patients with normal nasal resonance or varying degrees of hypernasality. Procedures: Oral and nasal acoustic measurements were made using the NasalView system. Nasalance distance and nasalance ratio were calculated for five nonnasal and three nasal sentences from the modified Heidelberg Rhinophonia Assessment Form. Results: Optimum cutoffs were derived from Receiver-Operating Characteristics. Results for the sentence stimuli ranged from 64.4% to 89.6% sensitivity and from 91.2% to 94.1% specificity. When the analysis was limited to only one nonnasal and one nasal sentence, results ranged from 79.7% to 87.5% sensitivity and from 88.2% to 97.1% specificity. Conclusions: We conclude that the two new measurements are valuable in routine clinical examinations. Nasalance distance and ratio derived from sentence stimuli are two useful and easily applicable measures that can be used to supplement the nasalance mean value.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAllen Press Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://cpcj.allenpress.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journalen_HK
dc.subjectCleft lip and palateen_HK
dc.subjectHypernasalityen_HK
dc.subjectHyperrhinophoniaen_HK
dc.subjectInstrumental analysis speechen_HK
dc.subjectNasalanceen_HK
dc.subjectNasalViewen_HK
dc.subjectNasometeren_HK
dc.titleNasalance distance and ratio: Two new measuresen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1055-6656&volume=37&issue=3&spage=248&epage=256&date=2000&atitle=Nasalance+distance+and+ratio:+Two+new+measuresen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWhitehill, TL: tara@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWhitehill, TL=rp00970en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10830803-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034064529en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros53166en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034064529&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage248en_HK
dc.identifier.epage256en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000086998600005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBressmann, T=6701472778en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSader, R=7003666504en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhitehill, TL=7004098633en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAwan, SN=8359382100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZeilhofer, HF=7005869022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHorch, HH=7004875565en_HK

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