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Article: Outcomes of transient evoked otoacoustic emission testing in 6-year-old school children: A comparison with pure tone screening and tympanometry

TitleOutcomes of transient evoked otoacoustic emission testing in 6-year-old school children: A comparison with pure tone screening and tympanometry
Authors
KeywordsHearing screening
Pass/fail criterion
School children
Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions
Tympanometry
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijporl
Citation
International Journal Of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 2001, v. 57 n. 1, p. 67-76 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: (1) To establish test performance measures for Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission testing of 6-year-old children in a school setting; (2) To investigate whether Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission testing provides a more accurate and effective alternative to a pure tone screening plus tympanometry protocol. Methods: Pure tone screening, tympanometry and transient evoked otoacoustic emission data were collected from 940 subjects (1880 ears), with a mean age of 6.2 years. Subjects were tested in non-sound-treated rooms within 22 schools. Receiver operating characteristics curves along with specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and efficiency values were determined for a variety of transient evoked otoacoustic emission/pure tone screening/tympanometry comparisons. Results: The Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission failure rate for the group was 20.3%. The failure rate for pure tone screening was found to be 8.9%, whilst 18.6% of subjects failed a protocol consisting of combined pure tone screening and tympanometry results. In essence, findings from the comparison of overall Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission pass/fail with overall pure tone screening pass/fail suggested that use of a modified Rhode Island Hearing Assessment Project criterion would result in a very high probability that a child with a pass result has normal hearing (true negative). However, the hit rate was only moderate. Selection of a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) criterion set at ≥1 dB appeared to provide the best test performance measures for the range of SNR values investigated. Test performance measures generally declined when tympanometry results were included, with the exception of lower false alarm rates and higher positive predictive values. The exclusion of low frequency data from the Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission SNR versus pure tone screening analysis resulted in improved performance measures. Conclusions: The present study poses several implications for the clinical implementation of Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission screening for entry level school children. Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission pass/fail criteria will require revision. The findings of the current investigation offer support to the possible replacement of pure tone screening with Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission testing for 6-year-old children. However, they do not suggest the replacement of the pure tone screening plus tympanometry battery. Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82558
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.125
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.649
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDriscoll, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKei, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:30:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:30:44Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 2001, v. 57 n. 1, p. 67-76en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0165-5876en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82558-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: (1) To establish test performance measures for Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission testing of 6-year-old children in a school setting; (2) To investigate whether Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission testing provides a more accurate and effective alternative to a pure tone screening plus tympanometry protocol. Methods: Pure tone screening, tympanometry and transient evoked otoacoustic emission data were collected from 940 subjects (1880 ears), with a mean age of 6.2 years. Subjects were tested in non-sound-treated rooms within 22 schools. Receiver operating characteristics curves along with specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and efficiency values were determined for a variety of transient evoked otoacoustic emission/pure tone screening/tympanometry comparisons. Results: The Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission failure rate for the group was 20.3%. The failure rate for pure tone screening was found to be 8.9%, whilst 18.6% of subjects failed a protocol consisting of combined pure tone screening and tympanometry results. In essence, findings from the comparison of overall Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission pass/fail with overall pure tone screening pass/fail suggested that use of a modified Rhode Island Hearing Assessment Project criterion would result in a very high probability that a child with a pass result has normal hearing (true negative). However, the hit rate was only moderate. Selection of a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) criterion set at ≥1 dB appeared to provide the best test performance measures for the range of SNR values investigated. Test performance measures generally declined when tympanometry results were included, with the exception of lower false alarm rates and higher positive predictive values. The exclusion of low frequency data from the Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission SNR versus pure tone screening analysis resulted in improved performance measures. Conclusions: The present study poses several implications for the clinical implementation of Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission screening for entry level school children. Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission pass/fail criteria will require revision. The findings of the current investigation offer support to the possible replacement of pure tone screening with Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission testing for 6-year-old children. However, they do not suggest the replacement of the pure tone screening plus tympanometry battery. Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijporlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngologyen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. Copyright © Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectHearing screeningen_HK
dc.subjectPass/fail criterionen_HK
dc.subjectSchool childrenen_HK
dc.subjectTransient evoked otoacoustic emissionsen_HK
dc.subjectTympanometryen_HK
dc.titleOutcomes of transient evoked otoacoustic emission testing in 6-year-old school children: A comparison with pure tone screening and tympanometryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0165-5876&volume=57&spage=67&epage=76&date=2001&atitle=Outcomes+of+transient+evoked+otoacoustic+emission+testing+in+6-year-old+school+children:+a+comparison+with+pure+tone+screening+and+tympanometry.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcPherson, B: dbmcpher@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcPherson, B=rp00937en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0165-5876(00)00445-6en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11165644-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035143918en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros58630en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035143918&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume57en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage67en_HK
dc.identifier.epage76en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000166355500010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDriscoll, C=7202046484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKei, J=7003334206en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcPherson, B=7006800770en_HK

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