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Article: Negotiating emigration and the family: Individual solutions to the 1997 anxiety

TitleNegotiating emigration and the family: Individual solutions to the 1997 anxiety
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=7
Citation
Annals Of The American Academy Of Political And Social Science, 1996 n. 547, p. 54-66 How to Cite?
AbstractIn an environment of decolonization and Sino-British disagreement, the Hong Kong people are reevaluating their status relating to the transfer of sovereignty from Britain to China. This is coupled with a sense of anomie resulting from the rapid shift to a postindustrial, postmodern era. The return to China could bring authoritarianism, yet movement toward postindustrialism and postmodernism represents liberalism. How do Hong Kong people cope with these two dialectically opposed sociopolitical and socioeconomic processes? This article explores how individuals and families cope with political uncertainty through negotiating emigration and marriage strategies. In selecting their strategies, they face dislocation in their host countries. All the while they must wrestle with issues of loyalty and identity; they must answer to themselves, ultimately to the Chinese government, and to the government of their adopted home.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82465
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.708
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.164
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKuah, KEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:29:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:29:36Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of The American Academy Of Political And Social Science, 1996 n. 547, p. 54-66en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-7162en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82465-
dc.description.abstractIn an environment of decolonization and Sino-British disagreement, the Hong Kong people are reevaluating their status relating to the transfer of sovereignty from Britain to China. This is coupled with a sense of anomie resulting from the rapid shift to a postindustrial, postmodern era. The return to China could bring authoritarianism, yet movement toward postindustrialism and postmodernism represents liberalism. How do Hong Kong people cope with these two dialectically opposed sociopolitical and socioeconomic processes? This article explores how individuals and families cope with political uncertainty through negotiating emigration and marriage strategies. In selecting their strategies, they face dislocation in their host countries. All the while they must wrestle with issues of loyalty and identity; they must answer to themselves, ultimately to the Chinese government, and to the government of their adopted home.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=7en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the American Academy of Political and Social Scienceen_HK
dc.titleNegotiating emigration and the family: Individual solutions to the 1997 anxietyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKuah, KE: kekuah@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKuah, KE=rp00567en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0039416155en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros25509en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0039416155&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.issue547en_HK
dc.identifier.spage54en_HK
dc.identifier.epage66en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKuah, KE=7006858605en_HK

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