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Article: Citizens and Outlaws: The Private Lives and Public Lifestyles of Women in the Illicit Drug Economy

TitleCitizens and Outlaws: The Private Lives and Public Lifestyles of Women in the Illicit Drug Economy
Authors
KeywordsFemale offenders
Amphetamines
Individual behavior
Drug smuggling
Issue Date1996
PublisherFlorida State University, School of Criminology & Criminal Justice. The Journal's web site is located at http://www2.criminology.fsu.edu/jdi/
Citation
Journal of Drug Issues, 1996, v. 26 n. 1, p. 125-142 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper utilizes findings from a qualitative study of methamphetamine among users in three U.S. communities: San Francisco, San Diego, and Honolulu. In-depth interviews were combined with survey questionnaires to explore the patterns, contexts, and consequences among an ethnically and culturally diverse sample of 150 moderate to heavy users in each site. A grounded theory method was used to identify and examine patterns of experiences, beliefs, and environments. One of the mast important findings emerging from this study concerns the unexpectedly high proportion of women with substantial experience as methamphetamine dealers and/or distributors. More than two-thirds of the 141 female respondent users were involved in diverse lifestyles and participated in the illicit methamphetamine market on a wide variety of levels. However, the majority considered this activity us a positive experience which provided them with economic independence, self-esteem, increased ability to function, professional pride, and ethics. Dealing was seen as supportive in their important need to maintain control: with social and intimate relationships, with daily living responsibilities, and with their drug use. The major problems reported by women dealers across all sites included: arrests and incarceration; violence; lack of trust in, and betrayal by, customers; and social and emotional dependency on the drug to feel normal and function without fear on a social level.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82458
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.086
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.686
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaidler, KAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:29:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:29:32Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Drug Issues, 1996, v. 26 n. 1, p. 125-142en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-0426en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82458-
dc.description.abstractThis paper utilizes findings from a qualitative study of methamphetamine among users in three U.S. communities: San Francisco, San Diego, and Honolulu. In-depth interviews were combined with survey questionnaires to explore the patterns, contexts, and consequences among an ethnically and culturally diverse sample of 150 moderate to heavy users in each site. A grounded theory method was used to identify and examine patterns of experiences, beliefs, and environments. One of the mast important findings emerging from this study concerns the unexpectedly high proportion of women with substantial experience as methamphetamine dealers and/or distributors. More than two-thirds of the 141 female respondent users were involved in diverse lifestyles and participated in the illicit methamphetamine market on a wide variety of levels. However, the majority considered this activity us a positive experience which provided them with economic independence, self-esteem, increased ability to function, professional pride, and ethics. Dealing was seen as supportive in their important need to maintain control: with social and intimate relationships, with daily living responsibilities, and with their drug use. The major problems reported by women dealers across all sites included: arrests and incarceration; violence; lack of trust in, and betrayal by, customers; and social and emotional dependency on the drug to feel normal and function without fear on a social level.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherFlorida State University, School of Criminology & Criminal Justice. The Journal's web site is located at http://www2.criminology.fsu.edu/jdi/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Drug Issuesen_HK
dc.subjectFemale offenders-
dc.subjectAmphetamines-
dc.subjectIndividual behavior-
dc.subjectDrug smuggling-
dc.titleCitizens and Outlaws: The Private Lives and Public Lifestyles of Women in the Illicit Drug Economyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-0426&volume=&spage=85&epage=109&date=1996&atitle=Citizens+and+Outlaws:+The+Private+Lives+and+Public+Lifestyles+of+Women+in+the+Illicit+Drug+Economyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaidler, KA: kjoe@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaidler, KA=rp00566en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029869872-
dc.identifier.hkuros25532en_HK
dc.identifier.volume26-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage125-
dc.identifier.epage142-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280929300007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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