File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Article: 'Drinking, kicking back and gang banging': alcohol, violence and street gangs

Title'Drinking, kicking back and gang banging': alcohol, violence and street gangs
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherOklahoma State University, Sociology Department. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ou.edu/special/freeinq/about.htm
Citation
Free Inquiry in Creative Sociology, 1996, v. 24 n. 2, p. 123-132 How to Cite?
AbstractCriminologists and sociologists have had a longstanding interest in gang violence. Dating back to Thrasher's (1927) ethnographic observations of Chicago's gangs in the 1920's. Debates have focused on a range of issues such as whether violence is a defining property of gangs. This question has led to analyses of the frequency, viability, severity, and organization of violence in gang life (Moore. Garcia , Garcia. Cerda. Valenc1a 1978: Sanchez-Jankowski 1991 . Sanders 1994: Taylor 1989). The etiology of gang violence also has been of central concern with a vanity of reasons being advanced. Yablonsky (1970) advocated a psycho- social framework in which gang violence was tied to the pathology of the group’s leadership. Other attempts to construct a causal model were connected by an interest in class issues. Miller (1958) advocated a culture of poverty argument in which gang life including violence merely reflected the focal concerns of the lower classes. Cohen (1955) argued that gang members· hostility and aggression represents a reaction-formation to their inability to measure up to the middle class measuring rod. They reject the rejecters and status is achieved through an alternative value system which emphasizes negativistic. Malicious and non-utilitarian behavior. Cloward and Ohlin ( 1960) took the notion of status deprivation further. Suggesting that the variations in the legitimate and illegitimate opportunities in different lower class communities influences whether a gang is criminal retreatist or violent.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82437
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJoe, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorWaldorf, D-
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:29:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:29:18Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFree Inquiry in Creative Sociology, 1996, v. 24 n. 2, p. 123-132en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0736-9182-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82437-
dc.description.abstractCriminologists and sociologists have had a longstanding interest in gang violence. Dating back to Thrasher's (1927) ethnographic observations of Chicago's gangs in the 1920's. Debates have focused on a range of issues such as whether violence is a defining property of gangs. This question has led to analyses of the frequency, viability, severity, and organization of violence in gang life (Moore. Garcia , Garcia. Cerda. Valenc1a 1978: Sanchez-Jankowski 1991 . Sanders 1994: Taylor 1989). The etiology of gang violence also has been of central concern with a vanity of reasons being advanced. Yablonsky (1970) advocated a psycho- social framework in which gang violence was tied to the pathology of the group’s leadership. Other attempts to construct a causal model were connected by an interest in class issues. Miller (1958) advocated a culture of poverty argument in which gang life including violence merely reflected the focal concerns of the lower classes. Cohen (1955) argued that gang members· hostility and aggression represents a reaction-formation to their inability to measure up to the middle class measuring rod. They reject the rejecters and status is achieved through an alternative value system which emphasizes negativistic. Malicious and non-utilitarian behavior. Cloward and Ohlin ( 1960) took the notion of status deprivation further. Suggesting that the variations in the legitimate and illegitimate opportunities in different lower class communities influences whether a gang is criminal retreatist or violent.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOklahoma State University, Sociology Department. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ou.edu/special/freeinq/about.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofFree Inquiry in Creative Sociologyen_HK
dc.title'Drinking, kicking back and gang banging': alcohol, violence and street gangsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJoe, K: kjoe@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaidler, KA=rp00566en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros33859en_HK
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage123-
dc.identifier.epage132-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats