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Article: Moralising ancestors as socio-moral capital: A study of a transnational Chinese lineage

TitleMoralising ancestors as socio-moral capital: A study of a transnational Chinese lineage
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherBrill Academic Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.brill.nl/m_catalogue_sub6_id8612.htm
Citation
Asian Journal Of Social Science, 2006, v. 34 n. 2, p. 243-263 How to Cite?
AbstractWithin the Chinese Diaspora, ancestor worship is an important cultural element that binds a group of people together and provides them with a sense of comfort, kinship and communal identity as they sink their cultural roots in a new country, luodi shenggen Thus, ancestor worship is widely reproduced and practised by the Chinese in the Diaspora, as it is central to the Chinese understanding of the continuation of family and lineage. However, in Mainland Chinese villages, the practice of ancestor worship, which is still considered important by the villagers, was not allowed until the Open Door Policy in 1978. With this policy, emigrant villages, (qiaoxiang) embarked on an aggressive campaign to woo the Chinese in overseas communities to return to their native villages to help with economic development through various strategies. One of the strategies is to allow for the revival and practice of ancestor worship in the rural villages. This paper explores how ancestors continued to be regarded as important members of a transnational lineage in the Fujian Province in South China, and also in Singapore. Because of the central focus on ancestors and ancestor worship in the Chinese society, ancestors are moralised as a significant social capital by the Chinese State, local government and rural villagers, in an attempt to establish transnational guanxi linkages between the ancestral villages in rural China and their Diaspora members in Singapore. The Chinese State, with instrumental consideration, sees this transnational guanxi networks and the revival of ancestor worship as a strategy to encourage the Chinese Diaspora to visit their ancestral home and help with village development. © 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82429
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.062
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.122
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEng, KPKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:29:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:29:13Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAsian Journal Of Social Science, 2006, v. 34 n. 2, p. 243-263en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1568-4849en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82429-
dc.description.abstractWithin the Chinese Diaspora, ancestor worship is an important cultural element that binds a group of people together and provides them with a sense of comfort, kinship and communal identity as they sink their cultural roots in a new country, luodi shenggen Thus, ancestor worship is widely reproduced and practised by the Chinese in the Diaspora, as it is central to the Chinese understanding of the continuation of family and lineage. However, in Mainland Chinese villages, the practice of ancestor worship, which is still considered important by the villagers, was not allowed until the Open Door Policy in 1978. With this policy, emigrant villages, (qiaoxiang) embarked on an aggressive campaign to woo the Chinese in overseas communities to return to their native villages to help with economic development through various strategies. One of the strategies is to allow for the revival and practice of ancestor worship in the rural villages. This paper explores how ancestors continued to be regarded as important members of a transnational lineage in the Fujian Province in South China, and also in Singapore. Because of the central focus on ancestors and ancestor worship in the Chinese society, ancestors are moralised as a significant social capital by the Chinese State, local government and rural villagers, in an attempt to establish transnational guanxi linkages between the ancestral villages in rural China and their Diaspora members in Singapore. The Chinese State, with instrumental consideration, sees this transnational guanxi networks and the revival of ancestor worship as a strategy to encourage the Chinese Diaspora to visit their ancestral home and help with village development. © 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBrill Academic Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.brill.nl/m_catalogue_sub6_id8612.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Journal of Social Scienceen_HK
dc.titleMoralising ancestors as socio-moral capital: A study of a transnational Chinese lineageen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1568-4849&volume=34&issue=2&spage=243&epage=263&date=2006&atitle=Moralising+ancestors+as+socio-moral+capital:+a+study+of+a+transnational+Chinese+lineage+en_HK
dc.identifier.emailEng, KPK: kekuah@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityEng, KPK=rp00567en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/156853106777371256-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745684446en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros124350en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745684446&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume34en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage243en_HK
dc.identifier.epage263en_HK
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEng, KPK=7006858605en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike668802-

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