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Article: Dynamics of social support: A longitudinal qualitative study on mainland Chinese immigrant women's first year of resettlement in Hong Kong

TitleDynamics of social support: A longitudinal qualitative study on mainland Chinese immigrant women's first year of resettlement in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsDynamics of social support
Hong Kong
Mainland Chinese immigrant women
Migration
Resettlement
Issue Date2006
PublisherHaworth Social Work Practice Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.haworthpress.com/web/SWMH
Citation
Social Work In Mental Health, 2006, v. 4 n. 3, p. 83-101 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study challenged the current conceptualization of social support as a static process and attempted to explore how the sources and types of social support unfolded over time during mainland Chinese immigrant women's first year of resettlement in Hong Kong. A longitudinal qualitative method was used and 15 immigrant women were recruited. In-depth interviews using a semi-structured interview guide were conducted at three-monthly intervals. Results supported our view on the "stages within stage" assumption of the resettlement period of the migration-integration process. In the first quarter of resettlement, immigrant women mobilized a great deal of instrumental and information support from family members and kin to resolve survival issues such as finances, housing and childcare. However, the demand for instrumental support declined over time, and the need for emotional support appeared to peak at the second stage of the resettlement period. Fellow immigrant women were found to be the most significant provid ers of information, emotional and social companionship support to immigrant women throughout the resettlement period while the supporting roles of husbands and kin diminished. Lastly, immigrant women were less inclined to seek help from formal networks and rarely sought support from neighbors and co-workers. Socio-economic and cultural reasons were used to explain these differential support patterns during immigrants' first year of resettlement in Hong Kong, and implications for social work practices were discussed. © 2006 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82305
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.263
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSong, HXen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:27:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:27:47Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSocial Work In Mental Health, 2006, v. 4 n. 3, p. 83-101en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1533-2985en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82305-
dc.description.abstractThis study challenged the current conceptualization of social support as a static process and attempted to explore how the sources and types of social support unfolded over time during mainland Chinese immigrant women's first year of resettlement in Hong Kong. A longitudinal qualitative method was used and 15 immigrant women were recruited. In-depth interviews using a semi-structured interview guide were conducted at three-monthly intervals. Results supported our view on the "stages within stage" assumption of the resettlement period of the migration-integration process. In the first quarter of resettlement, immigrant women mobilized a great deal of instrumental and information support from family members and kin to resolve survival issues such as finances, housing and childcare. However, the demand for instrumental support declined over time, and the need for emotional support appeared to peak at the second stage of the resettlement period. Fellow immigrant women were found to be the most significant provid ers of information, emotional and social companionship support to immigrant women throughout the resettlement period while the supporting roles of husbands and kin diminished. Lastly, immigrant women were less inclined to seek help from formal networks and rarely sought support from neighbors and co-workers. Socio-economic and cultural reasons were used to explain these differential support patterns during immigrants' first year of resettlement in Hong Kong, and implications for social work practices were discussed. © 2006 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHaworth Social Work Practice Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.haworthpress.com/web/SWMHen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Work in Mental Healthen_HK
dc.subjectDynamics of social supporten_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectMainland Chinese immigrant womenen_HK
dc.subjectMigrationen_HK
dc.subjectResettlementen_HK
dc.titleDynamics of social support: A longitudinal qualitative study on mainland Chinese immigrant women's first year of resettlement in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1533-2985&volume=4&spage=83&epage=101&date=2006&atitle=Dynamics+Of+Social+Support:+A+Longitudinal+Qualitative++++Study+On+Mainland+Chinese+Immigrant+Women’s+First+Year+Of+Resettlement+In+Hong+Kong.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1300/J200v04n03_05en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747185127en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros124062en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33747185127&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage83en_HK
dc.identifier.epage101en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSong, HX=14066660000en_HK

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