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Article: New economy and new social policy in East and Southeast Asian compact, mature economies: The case of Hong Kong

TitleNew economy and new social policy in East and Southeast Asian compact, mature economies: The case of Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAsian financial crisis
Compact
Hong Kong
Mature economies
Social welfare
Universalism and selectivism
Issue Date2003
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/SPOL
Citation
Social Policy And Administration, 2003, v. 37 n. 4, p. 411-422 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the 1970s, as the now compact, mature economies in East and Southeast Asia were industrializing, their governments had claimed that they saw no need for the kind of welfare programmes developed in Western "welfare states". Notwithstanding this claim, a study of social welfare development in these economies in the last three decades, particularly when Hong Kong is taken as an example, shows that they have gone for universal social welfare, largely as a result of the growing prosperity and the rising expectations of the people. This trend has, however, been reversed since the start of the Asian financial crisis in the latter part of 1997, with the resultant slowing down of the economy, rising unemployment and surging fiscal deficits. Governments of the compact, mature economies in East and Southeast Asia found that they must rethink their social commitments and in order to return to balanced budgets, the former selective approach is now adopted by concentrating social welfare resources on the most needy people. While it is not in dispute that there is a close and positive relationship between industrialization and social welfare, the case of the compact, mature economies in East and Southeast Asia shows that as they are more vulnerable to world economic vicissitudes, the relationship may not be as steady as it has been in the Western industrial states.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82303
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.069
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.787
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChow, NWSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:27:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:27:46Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSocial Policy And Administration, 2003, v. 37 n. 4, p. 411-422en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0144-5596en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82303-
dc.description.abstractIn the 1970s, as the now compact, mature economies in East and Southeast Asia were industrializing, their governments had claimed that they saw no need for the kind of welfare programmes developed in Western "welfare states". Notwithstanding this claim, a study of social welfare development in these economies in the last three decades, particularly when Hong Kong is taken as an example, shows that they have gone for universal social welfare, largely as a result of the growing prosperity and the rising expectations of the people. This trend has, however, been reversed since the start of the Asian financial crisis in the latter part of 1997, with the resultant slowing down of the economy, rising unemployment and surging fiscal deficits. Governments of the compact, mature economies in East and Southeast Asia found that they must rethink their social commitments and in order to return to balanced budgets, the former selective approach is now adopted by concentrating social welfare resources on the most needy people. While it is not in dispute that there is a close and positive relationship between industrialization and social welfare, the case of the compact, mature economies in East and Southeast Asia shows that as they are more vulnerable to world economic vicissitudes, the relationship may not be as steady as it has been in the Western industrial states.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/SPOLen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Policy and Administrationen_HK
dc.subjectAsian financial crisisen_HK
dc.subjectCompacten_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectMature economiesen_HK
dc.subjectSocial welfareen_HK
dc.subjectUniversalism and selectivismen_HK
dc.titleNew economy and new social policy in East and Southeast Asian compact, mature economies: The case of Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChow, NWS: hrnwcws@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChow, NWS=rp00582en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-9515.00348en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0042267234en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros83807en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0042267234&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage411en_HK
dc.identifier.epage422en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000184319500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, NWS=35857105900en_HK

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