File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Psychosocial risk factors associated with falls among Chinese community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kong

TitlePsychosocial risk factors associated with falls among Chinese community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Falls
Living alone
Psychosocial factors
Issue Date2010
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/ads.asp?ref=0966-0410
Citation
Health And Social Care In The Community, 2010, v. 18 n. 3, p. 272-281 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined the relationship between psychosocial factors and falls among community-dwelling older adults in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China. The study included 1573 adults aged 60 or above who lived at home and who were applying for long-term care services. These participants were part of a large cross-sectional survey carried out between 2003 and 2004 in which they completed the Hong Kong Chinese version of the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care (RAI-HC) assessment. Of those persons who were surveyed, 516 (32.8%, 95% CI 30.5% to 35.2%) had fallen in the previous 90 days. Bivariate analyses showed that five psychosocial factors (depressive symptoms, fear of falling, a decline in social activities, the number of hours of informal care support during weekdays and living alone) were significantly associated with falls (. P <. 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed living alone (odds ratio (OR) = 0.62; 95% CI 0.44 to 0.86) was the only psychosocial factor significantly associated with falls, after adjusting for the known significant factors related to falls. It was also found that more elders who lived with others had environmental hazards than those who lived alone (71.0% vs 29.0%, 2 = 4.80, . P = 0.028). These findings suggested that living with others may not be as safe as we assume. Interventions to increase awareness of home safety and to seek co-operation with family members in falls prevention are recommended. Fall preventive strategies should be educated to family members who are living with frail older adults. On the other hand, Chinese older adults who live alone often receive support from relatives or friends. Social support seems to be crucial to prevent them from falls and this measure is recommended to be continued in the community. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82301
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.557
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.790
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChi, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorLou, VWQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:27:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:27:44Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHealth And Social Care In The Community, 2010, v. 18 n. 3, p. 272-281en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0966-0410en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82301-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship between psychosocial factors and falls among community-dwelling older adults in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China. The study included 1573 adults aged 60 or above who lived at home and who were applying for long-term care services. These participants were part of a large cross-sectional survey carried out between 2003 and 2004 in which they completed the Hong Kong Chinese version of the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care (RAI-HC) assessment. Of those persons who were surveyed, 516 (32.8%, 95% CI 30.5% to 35.2%) had fallen in the previous 90 days. Bivariate analyses showed that five psychosocial factors (depressive symptoms, fear of falling, a decline in social activities, the number of hours of informal care support during weekdays and living alone) were significantly associated with falls (. P <. 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed living alone (odds ratio (OR) = 0.62; 95% CI 0.44 to 0.86) was the only psychosocial factor significantly associated with falls, after adjusting for the known significant factors related to falls. It was also found that more elders who lived with others had environmental hazards than those who lived alone (71.0% vs 29.0%, 2 = 4.80, . P = 0.028). These findings suggested that living with others may not be as safe as we assume. Interventions to increase awareness of home safety and to seek co-operation with family members in falls prevention are recommended. Fall preventive strategies should be educated to family members who are living with frail older adults. On the other hand, Chinese older adults who live alone often receive support from relatives or friends. Social support seems to be crucial to prevent them from falls and this measure is recommended to be continued in the community. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/ads.asp?ref=0966-0410en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHealth and Social Care in the Communityen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectFallsen_HK
dc.subjectLiving aloneen_HK
dc.subjectPsychosocial factorsen_HK
dc.titlePsychosocial risk factors associated with falls among Chinese community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0966-0410&volume=18&issue=3&spage=272&epage=281&date=2010&atitle=Psychosocial+risk+factors+associated+with+falls+among+Chinese+community-dwelling+older+adults+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, A: angleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLou, VWQ: wlou@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, A=rp00405en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLou, VWQ=rp00607en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2524.2009.00900.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20088953-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953819230en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros167686en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953819230&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage272en_HK
dc.identifier.epage281en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276861500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, A=7403012650en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChi, I=7005697907en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLou, VWQ=9846416500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KS=15924732400en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats