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Article: Cultural icons and marketing of gambling

TitleCultural icons and marketing of gambling
Authors
KeywordsCultural icons and gambling
Ethnic populations and public health
Indigenous
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,11855,4-40666-70-72976028-0,00.html?changeHeader=true
Citation
International Journal Of Mental Health And Addiction, 2009, v. 7 n. 1, p. 84-96 How to Cite?
AbstractA number of different countries and states have or are in the process of developing formal or informal guidelines to govern gambling advertising and marketing of gambling. There is a growing consensus that gambling advertising should not mislead the public, be fair, provide information on the odds of wining and there should be provisions in place to protect vulnerable groups, such as, children. In the development of these guidelines by different countries or states there has been no real consideration of the need to engage with different indigenous and ethnic populations to ensure that they are protected as vulnerable populations. Further there is a need to engage with these populations within countries and across countries to ensure that indigenous and ethnic minority cultural icons, values, religious practices and music are not used without their permission or exploited in the business of promoting and marketing different forms of gambling products. New Zealand's experience of marketing and advertising of gambling is discussed in this paper. It is outlined the development of casinos in New Zealand and how Maori were actively encouraged to participate in the opening of these establishments and therefore, legitimate their existence as a safe place for Maori, the indigenous population of New Zealand to frequent on a regular basis. Since then other ethnic minority populations have been targeted to engage in different forms of gambling by recognising their significant cultural events, importance of family events and celebrating and promoting the success of important sport role models. Gambling advertising can be direct or subtle, however, little research has focussed on the third person effect associated with gambling advertising. New Zealand has adopted a public health approach to reduce gambling related harm. One of the key strategies introduced to reduce gambling related harm has been the development and implementation of harm minimisation regulations. Research conducted in New Zealand regarding individuals' attitudes and behaviour to gambling, highlights that Maori have a high recall of gambling advertisements alongside other ethnic populations. The paper suggests that as part of a public health approach to reduce gambling related harm that it is now timely in New Zealand, for consideration to be given as to how much exposure, if any, New Zealanders should be subjected to gambling advertising. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82287
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.018
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.473
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDyall, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKingi, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:27:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:27:35Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Mental Health And Addiction, 2009, v. 7 n. 1, p. 84-96en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1557-1874en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82287-
dc.description.abstractA number of different countries and states have or are in the process of developing formal or informal guidelines to govern gambling advertising and marketing of gambling. There is a growing consensus that gambling advertising should not mislead the public, be fair, provide information on the odds of wining and there should be provisions in place to protect vulnerable groups, such as, children. In the development of these guidelines by different countries or states there has been no real consideration of the need to engage with different indigenous and ethnic populations to ensure that they are protected as vulnerable populations. Further there is a need to engage with these populations within countries and across countries to ensure that indigenous and ethnic minority cultural icons, values, religious practices and music are not used without their permission or exploited in the business of promoting and marketing different forms of gambling products. New Zealand's experience of marketing and advertising of gambling is discussed in this paper. It is outlined the development of casinos in New Zealand and how Maori were actively encouraged to participate in the opening of these establishments and therefore, legitimate their existence as a safe place for Maori, the indigenous population of New Zealand to frequent on a regular basis. Since then other ethnic minority populations have been targeted to engage in different forms of gambling by recognising their significant cultural events, importance of family events and celebrating and promoting the success of important sport role models. Gambling advertising can be direct or subtle, however, little research has focussed on the third person effect associated with gambling advertising. New Zealand has adopted a public health approach to reduce gambling related harm. One of the key strategies introduced to reduce gambling related harm has been the development and implementation of harm minimisation regulations. Research conducted in New Zealand regarding individuals' attitudes and behaviour to gambling, highlights that Maori have a high recall of gambling advertisements alongside other ethnic populations. The paper suggests that as part of a public health approach to reduce gambling related harm that it is now timely in New Zealand, for consideration to be given as to how much exposure, if any, New Zealanders should be subjected to gambling advertising. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,11855,4-40666-70-72976028-0,00.html?changeHeader=trueen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Mental Health and Addictionen_HK
dc.subjectCultural icons and gamblingen_HK
dc.subjectEthnic populations and public healthen_HK
dc.subjectIndigenousen_HK
dc.titleCultural icons and marketing of gamblingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1557-1874&volume=7&spage=84&epage=96&date=2008&atitle=Cultural+icons+and+marketing+of+gamblingen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, S: samsont@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, S=rp00627en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11469-007-9145-xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-60349127696en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros161778en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-60349127696&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage84en_HK
dc.identifier.epage96en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDyall, L=11540305700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, S=7006643163en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKingi, A=26029449200en_HK

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