File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Ageing in Hong Kong

TitleAgeing in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/AJA
Citation
Australasian Journal on Ageing, 1999, v. 18 n. 2, p. 66-71 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong has experienced a steady and significant growth in its elderly population. Being essentially a Chinese community, the traditional virtue of filial piety has been upheld and the family is expected to be the prime source of care for its members. However, there has been a gradual increase in the number of nuclear families and a gradual dwindling of the positive image of the elderly person, which threatens the basis for community care for the elderly. About half of the elderly population are living in government rental housing and are receiving public primary medical care. Community support services are not in-home support in nature and are of low levels of care. The professional and social organisations unanimously urge the government to take a more proactive stance in providing services to the elderly and encourage the community to revitalise its traditional Chinese cultural heritage in caring for the elderly.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82195
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.667
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.390
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChi, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorChui, EWTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:26:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:26:34Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAustralasian Journal on Ageing, 1999, v. 18 n. 2, p. 66-71en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1440-6381en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/82195-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong has experienced a steady and significant growth in its elderly population. Being essentially a Chinese community, the traditional virtue of filial piety has been upheld and the family is expected to be the prime source of care for its members. However, there has been a gradual increase in the number of nuclear families and a gradual dwindling of the positive image of the elderly person, which threatens the basis for community care for the elderly. About half of the elderly population are living in government rental housing and are receiving public primary medical care. Community support services are not in-home support in nature and are of low levels of care. The professional and social organisations unanimously urge the government to take a more proactive stance in providing services to the elderly and encourage the community to revitalise its traditional Chinese cultural heritage in caring for the elderly.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/AJAen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAustralasian Journal on Ageingen_HK
dc.titleAgeing in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1440-6381&volume=18&issue=2&spage=66&epage=71&date=1999&atitle=Ageing+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChi, I: irischi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChui, EWT: ernest@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChui, EWT=rp00587en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1741-6612.1999.tb00098.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0003161936-
dc.identifier.hkuros44594en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000080865400006-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats