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Article: The evolution and future of pond and marine fish culture in Hong Kong

TitleThe evolution and future of pond and marine fish culture in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCommon property
Hong Kong
Marine fish culture
Pond fish culture
Privatization
Property rights
Transaction cost
Issue Date1999
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.uq.edu.au/aem/journal.htm
Citation
Aquaculture Economics And Management, 1999, v. 3 n. 3, p. 254-266 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper provides a case study of the evolution of the freshwater food fish and marine food fish culture industries in Hong Kong as a highly urbanized and polluted metropolis. This study lends support to the thesis that marine fish culture is generally more sustainable than pond fish culture, owing to the fact that oceanic resources are relatively less scarce than land resources - even though the transaction costs of delineating and enforcing private property in the former are much higher. The case study gives a brief historical account of the evolution of the freshwater food fish and marine food fish culture industries in Hong Kong, identifies the technical inputs constraining the survival and prospects of these industries, and evaluates the relevance of the private property rights approach to their sustainability. Examination of the culture industries reveals the differences in property right characteristics of both industries. In addition to the differentiation in the degree of privatization between freshwater food fish and marine food fish culture, the major characteristics and inputs for culture practices in both industries are also examined. A qualitative evaluation of the relative significance of these inputs to the sustainability of the culture industries is provided. It is argued that the escalation in the factor price of land will destroy the local pond fish culture industry even though it is more 'private' than marine fish culture, notwithstanding the fact that substantial areas of intertidal ponds are owned by government and that in-filling of fishponds have been subject to stringent planning control. The policy implications of the case study are spelled out.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81928
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.175
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.422
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, LWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KKHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:23:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:23:32Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAquaculture Economics And Management, 1999, v. 3 n. 3, p. 254-266en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1365-7305en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81928-
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides a case study of the evolution of the freshwater food fish and marine food fish culture industries in Hong Kong as a highly urbanized and polluted metropolis. This study lends support to the thesis that marine fish culture is generally more sustainable than pond fish culture, owing to the fact that oceanic resources are relatively less scarce than land resources - even though the transaction costs of delineating and enforcing private property in the former are much higher. The case study gives a brief historical account of the evolution of the freshwater food fish and marine food fish culture industries in Hong Kong, identifies the technical inputs constraining the survival and prospects of these industries, and evaluates the relevance of the private property rights approach to their sustainability. Examination of the culture industries reveals the differences in property right characteristics of both industries. In addition to the differentiation in the degree of privatization between freshwater food fish and marine food fish culture, the major characteristics and inputs for culture practices in both industries are also examined. A qualitative evaluation of the relative significance of these inputs to the sustainability of the culture industries is provided. It is argued that the escalation in the factor price of land will destroy the local pond fish culture industry even though it is more 'private' than marine fish culture, notwithstanding the fact that substantial areas of intertidal ponds are owned by government and that in-filling of fishponds have been subject to stringent planning control. The policy implications of the case study are spelled out.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.uq.edu.au/aem/journal.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAquaculture Economics and Managementen_HK
dc.subjectCommon propertyen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectMarine fish cultureen_HK
dc.subjectPond fish cultureen_HK
dc.subjectPrivatizationen_HK
dc.subjectProperty rightsen_HK
dc.subjectTransaction costen_HK
dc.titleThe evolution and future of pond and marine fish culture in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1365-7305&volume=3 3&spage=254&epage=266&date=1999&atitle=The+Evolution+and+Future+of+Pond+and+Marine+Fish+Culture+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, LWC:wclai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, LWC=rp01004en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033281729en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros60165en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033281729&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage254en_HK
dc.identifier.epage266en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, LWC=7202616218en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KKH=7403657153en_HK

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