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Article: Ambiguous space, ambiguous rights - Corporate power and social control in Hong Kong

TitleAmbiguous space, ambiguous rights - Corporate power and social control in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAmbiguous space
Discretionary power
Surveillance
The new class
Issue Date1997
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cities
Citation
Cities, 1997, v. 14 n. 5, p. 295-311 How to Cite?
AbstractThe precursor to this article was published under the title of The right to the city (Cuthbert, 1995). In that work, the interactions between surveillance, private interest and the public domain in Hong Kong were investigated. The paper argued that a real confusion exists with regard to the delineation of social space, a situation underwritten by the processes through which development rights are granted to corporations and 'big capital' as a whole. In consequence, the idea of the citizen's right to occupy certain open spaces in the city is rapidly becoming obscured as corporate space becomes conflated to social space. The term 'ambiguous spaces' was coined to describe this situation. Below, we refine these ideas by examining in greater detail the actual methods by which ambiguous spaces come into being. Detailed studies have been made to investigate the specificities of this process - how development rights are granted, what conditions are agreed upon and how deals are struck. From this we build a clearer picture of how everyday life in the (post)modern world of Hong Kong has been circumscribed through the discretionary power of the local state, the corporate strategies which direct the form and content of social space, and the deliberate manipulation of the planning system to accommodate private capital. While specific mechanisms and practices are unique to Hong Kong's dynamic political economy, we expose below one aspect of a phenomenon which we would argue increasingly underwrites urban space in western societies as a whole. © 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81894
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.051
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.422
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCuthbert, ARen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcKinnell, KGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:23:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:23:09Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCities, 1997, v. 14 n. 5, p. 295-311en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0264-2751en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81894-
dc.description.abstractThe precursor to this article was published under the title of The right to the city (Cuthbert, 1995). In that work, the interactions between surveillance, private interest and the public domain in Hong Kong were investigated. The paper argued that a real confusion exists with regard to the delineation of social space, a situation underwritten by the processes through which development rights are granted to corporations and 'big capital' as a whole. In consequence, the idea of the citizen's right to occupy certain open spaces in the city is rapidly becoming obscured as corporate space becomes conflated to social space. The term 'ambiguous spaces' was coined to describe this situation. Below, we refine these ideas by examining in greater detail the actual methods by which ambiguous spaces come into being. Detailed studies have been made to investigate the specificities of this process - how development rights are granted, what conditions are agreed upon and how deals are struck. From this we build a clearer picture of how everyday life in the (post)modern world of Hong Kong has been circumscribed through the discretionary power of the local state, the corporate strategies which direct the form and content of social space, and the deliberate manipulation of the planning system to accommodate private capital. While specific mechanisms and practices are unique to Hong Kong's dynamic political economy, we expose below one aspect of a phenomenon which we would argue increasingly underwrites urban space in western societies as a whole. © 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/citiesen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCitiesen_HK
dc.subjectAmbiguous spaceen_HK
dc.subjectDiscretionary poweren_HK
dc.subjectSurveillanceen_HK
dc.subjectThe new classen_HK
dc.titleAmbiguous space, ambiguous rights - Corporate power and social control in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0264-2751&volume=14&issue=5&spage=295&epage=311&date=1997&atitle=Ambiguous+Space,+Ambiguous+Rights+-+Corporate+Power+and+Social+Control+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcKinnell, KG: kgmckinn@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcKinnell, KG=rp01013en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0264-2751(97)00020-6-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031433187en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros35866en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031433187&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage295en_HK
dc.identifier.epage311en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCuthbert, AR=7102540349en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcKinnell, KG=6507196785en_HK

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