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Article: In search of Chineseness: the abused child syndrome and individual rights

TitleIn search of Chineseness: the abused child syndrome and individual rights
Authors
KeywordsCommunication
Child rearing
Child care
Parent & child
Civil rights
Issue Date1994
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co.
Citation
Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, 1994, v. 5 n. 3, p. 177-182 How to Cite?
AbstractThe problem of Chinese national character has always intrigued scholars. There is the urge to seek common denominators, one of them being Chinese child-rearing. The Chinese child in conditioned to treat his or her homes as a haven against the outside world. This foster insecurity in every generation of Chinese, who naturally wish to exert control over younger generation. People who are dependent are inevitably selfish and clinging. Genetic influences might affect the intelligence, activity level and emotionality. One way for women to foster their power base is to win total allegiance of their children inside the family. Chinese people involve intensely with a close circle of people and avoid stranger. They are fearful of offending others and not confident in themselves. Studies have shown that Hong Chinese seen to mature quite late, perhaps in the early thirties. Being infantile themselves, Hong Kong parents often inculcate short-sighted attitudes toward general society by treating it as largely insignificant, there is no respect for the individual rights of others. This mentality does not foster the doctrine of the Rule of Law when Hong Kong becomes a Special Administrative Region of Chine after 30 June 1997. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81866
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.152

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsu, BFC-
dc.contributor.authorSun, LK-
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:22:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:22:51Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Asian Pacific Communication, 1994, v. 5 n. 3, p. 177-182-
dc.identifier.issn0957-6851-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81866-
dc.description.abstractThe problem of Chinese national character has always intrigued scholars. There is the urge to seek common denominators, one of them being Chinese child-rearing. The Chinese child in conditioned to treat his or her homes as a haven against the outside world. This foster insecurity in every generation of Chinese, who naturally wish to exert control over younger generation. People who are dependent are inevitably selfish and clinging. Genetic influences might affect the intelligence, activity level and emotionality. One way for women to foster their power base is to win total allegiance of their children inside the family. Chinese people involve intensely with a close circle of people and avoid stranger. They are fearful of offending others and not confident in themselves. Studies have shown that Hong Chinese seen to mature quite late, perhaps in the early thirties. Being infantile themselves, Hong Kong parents often inculcate short-sighted attitudes toward general society by treating it as largely insignificant, there is no respect for the individual rights of others. This mentality does not foster the doctrine of the Rule of Law when Hong Kong becomes a Special Administrative Region of Chine after 30 June 1997. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co. -
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Asian Pacific Communication-
dc.rightsJournal of Asian Pacific Communication. Copyright © John Benjamins Publishing Co.-
dc.rightsReaders of post-print must contact John Benjamins Publishing for further reprinting or re-use-
dc.subjectCommunication-
dc.subjectChild rearing-
dc.subjectChild care-
dc.subjectParent & child-
dc.subjectCivil rights-
dc.titleIn search of Chineseness: the abused child syndrome and individual rights-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0957-6851&volume=5&issue=3&spage=177&epage=182&date=1994&atitle=The+abused+child+syndrome+on+individual+rightsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHsu, BFC: bhsu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHsu, BFC=rp01002-
dc.identifier.hkuros3744-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage177-
dc.identifier.epage182-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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