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Article: Low-rise residential developments in green belts: A Hong Kong empirical study of planning applications

TitleLow-rise residential developments in green belts: A Hong Kong empirical study of planning applications
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02697459.asp
Citation
Planning Practice And Research, 2001, v. 16 n. 3-4, p. 321-335 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper is an econometric study of the planning application statistics for a special category of permissible land use in Hong Kong in green belt zones. The permissible use in question is that of the house, which refers to both the 'small house' for 'indigenous villagers' and ordinary houses that require building permission. The existence of such permissible residential use obviously distinguishes the idea of green belts from the UK concept as expressed in the quotation from Home (1997) above. This paper draws definitive conclusions within this idiosyncratic context about two potentially conflicting local land use policies: the 'small house' policy; and green belt policy with a presumption against development. The idea of green belts (as green belt zones) in Hong Kong, as an ex-UK Crown Colony,1 is not the same as that behind their Western counterparts. The findings of this paper are also specific to one planning jurisdiction. Hence, the facts and findings presented in this paper should be of interest to the historian on colonial planning and the local policy maker. Yet, it is believed that the type of data and method presented in this paper should also be of wider interest for the urban planning researcher. Such wider interest is predicated not only on an increasing awareness of the economics of green belts and other conservation zones but also on a concern with methods to interpret planning statistics, a concern to which we turn.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81812
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.129
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, LWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, WKOen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:22:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:22:15Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlanning Practice And Research, 2001, v. 16 n. 3-4, p. 321-335en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-7459en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81812-
dc.description.abstractThis paper is an econometric study of the planning application statistics for a special category of permissible land use in Hong Kong in green belt zones. The permissible use in question is that of the house, which refers to both the 'small house' for 'indigenous villagers' and ordinary houses that require building permission. The existence of such permissible residential use obviously distinguishes the idea of green belts from the UK concept as expressed in the quotation from Home (1997) above. This paper draws definitive conclusions within this idiosyncratic context about two potentially conflicting local land use policies: the 'small house' policy; and green belt policy with a presumption against development. The idea of green belts (as green belt zones) in Hong Kong, as an ex-UK Crown Colony,1 is not the same as that behind their Western counterparts. The findings of this paper are also specific to one planning jurisdiction. Hence, the facts and findings presented in this paper should be of interest to the historian on colonial planning and the local policy maker. Yet, it is believed that the type of data and method presented in this paper should also be of wider interest for the urban planning researcher. Such wider interest is predicated not only on an increasing awareness of the economics of green belts and other conservation zones but also on a concern with methods to interpret planning statistics, a concern to which we turn.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02697459.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPlanning Practice and Researchen_HK
dc.titleLow-rise residential developments in green belts: A Hong Kong empirical study of planning applicationsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0269-7459&volume=16&issue=3/4&spage=321&epage=335&date=2001&atitle=Low-Rise+Residential+Developments+in+Green+Belts:+A+Hong+Kong+Empirical+Study+of+Planning+Applicationsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, LWC:wclai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, LWC=rp01004en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02697450120112398en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035671379en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros72850en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035671379&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage321en_HK
dc.identifier.epage335en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, LWC=7202616218en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, WKO=7402968897en_HK

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